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Unemployment duration and unemployment insurance: a comparative analysis based on Scandinavian micro data


  • Knut Røed
  • Peter Jensen
  • Anna Thoursie


Based on pooled register data from Norway and Sweden, we find that differences in unemployment duration patterns reflect dissimilarities in unemployment insurance (UI) systems in a way that convincingly establishes the link between economic incentives and job search behaviour. Specifically, UI benefits are relatively more generous for low-income workers in Sweden than in Norway, leading to relatively longer unemployment spells for low-income workers in Sweden. Based on the between-countries variation in replacement ratios, we find that the elasticity of the outflow rate from insured unemployment with respect to the replacement ratio is approximately one in Norway and 0.5 in Sweden. Copyright 2008 , Oxford University Press.

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  • Knut Røed & Peter Jensen & Anna Thoursie, 2008. "Unemployment duration and unemployment insurance: a comparative analysis based on Scandinavian micro data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 254-274, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:60:y:2008:i:2:p:254-274

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Arnaud Chevalier & Joanne Lindley, 2009. "Overeducation and the skills of UK graduates," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(2), pages 307-337.
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    6. Walker, Ian & Zhu, Yu, 2005. "The College Wage Premium, Overeducation, and the Expansion of Higher Education in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 1627, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    8. Francis Green & Steven McIntosh, 2007. "Is there a genuine under-utilization of skills amongst the over-qualified?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 427-439.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fevang, Elisabeth & Hardoy, Inés & Røed, Knut, 2013. "Getting Disabled Workers Back to Work: How Important Are Economic Incentives?," IZA Discussion Papers 7137, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Holmlund, Bertil, 2014. "What do labor market institutions do?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 62-69.
    3. Røed, Knut, 2012. "Active Unemployment Insurance," IZA Policy Papers 41, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Røed, Knut & Westlie, Lars, 2007. "Unemployment Insurance in Welfare States: Soft Constraints and Mild Sanctions," Memorandum 13/2007, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:prg:jnlpol:v:2017:y:2017:i:4:id:1157:p:501-519 is not listed on IDEAS

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