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Practices for Managing Information Flows within Organizations

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  • Demski, Joel S, et al

Abstract

Firm organization determines how coworkers communicate and how information flows within the firm. Banking, accounting, consulting, and legal firms process proprietary information which their clients wish to protect. The firm's ability to safeguard and manage information determines its market demand. Yet employees may leak and otherwise abuse information to enhance their personal performance and wealth. This article analyzes how bureaucracies are erected within the firm to control information flows and protect clients. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Demski, Joel S, et al, 1999. "Practices for Managing Information Flows within Organizations," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 107-131, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jleorg:v:15:y:1999:i:1:p:107-31
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    Cited by:

    1. James Anton & Hillary Greene & Dennis Yao, 2006. "Policy Implications of Weak Patent Rights," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 6, pages 1-26 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kirsten Foss & Nicolai J. Foss, "undated". "Authority and Discretion: Tensions, Credible Delegation, and Implications for New Organizational Forms," IVS/CBS Working Papers 2002-08, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy, Copenhagen Business School.
    3. Terek Milan, 2016. "Information Channels Effectiveness Assessment on the Basis of Data from Statistical Survey," Scientific Annals of Economics and Business, De Gruyter Open, vol. 63(2), pages 225-235, June.
    4. Bolton, Patrick & Freixas, Xavier & Shapiro, Joel, 2007. "Conflicts of interest, information provision, and competition in the financial services industry," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 297-330, August.
    5. Yin, H., 2014. "Organizational architecture and pro-social behavior : Three essays," Other publications TiSEM d9fb03b9-cf92-4667-bd94-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. Mariagiovanna Baccara, 2007. "Outsourcing, information leakage, and consulting firms," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 38(1), pages 269-289, March.

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