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Technological regimes and the persistence of first-mover advantages

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  • Jungho Kim
  • Chang-Yang Lee

Abstract

This article investigates first-mover and early-entrant advantages in terms of market share and its growth by analyzing a unique panel data set of Korean manufacturing firms. Specifically, this article examines the existence and persistence of first-mover and early-entrant advantages across different technological regimes. We find that these advantages are influenced by characteristics of the firms, as well as, of the technological regimes under which they operate. In general, early entry into a market benefits a firm in terms of the size and growth rate of its market share. Early entrants, including first movers, have higher market shares, except in regimes with high technological opportunity and low R&D appropriability. However, first movers are disadvantaged in terms of market share growth, except in regimes with low technological opportunities and high R&D appropriability. We also find that firm-specific competences in R&D and advertising help to maintain (attenuate) first-mover and early-entrant advantages (disadvantages). Copyright 2011 The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Associazione ICC. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jungho Kim & Chang-Yang Lee, 2011. "Technological regimes and the persistence of first-mover advantages," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(5), pages 1305-1333, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:20:y:2011:i:5:p:1305-1333
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icc/dtr048
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristiano Antonelli & Francesco Crespi & Giuseppe Scellato, 2015. "Productivity growth persistence: firm strategies, size and system properties," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 129-147, June.
    2. Bruno Versaevel, 2015. "Alertness, Leadership, and Nascent Market Dynamics," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 440-466, December.
    3. Roper, Stephen & Tapinos, Efstathios, 2016. "Taking risks in the face of uncertainty: An exploratory analysis of green innovation," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 357-363.
    4. Silviano Esteve Pérez & Fabio Pieri & Diego Rodriguez, 2015. "Age and productivity as determinants of firm survival over the product life cycle," Working Papers 1502, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    5. Kim, Jungho & Lee, Chang-Yang, 2016. "Technological regimes and firm survival," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 232-243.
    6. Muscio, Alessandro & Nardone, Gianluca & Stasi, Antonio, 2012. "Perceived Technological Regimes: An Empirical Analysis of the Apulian Wine Industry," 2012 International European Forum, February 13-17, 2012, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 144969, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    7. repec:spr:chfecr:v:4:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1186_s40589-016-0044-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Añón Higón, Dolores, 2016. "In-house versus external basic research and first-to-market innovations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 816-829.

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