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Applying organizational routines in understanding organizational change

  • Markus C. Becker
  • Nathalie Lazaric
  • Richard R. Nelson
  • Sidney G. Winter

Organizational routines are considered basic components of organizational behavior and repositories of organizational capabilities (Nelson & Winter, 1982). They do, therefore, hold one of the keys to understanding organizational change. The article focuses on how the concept of organizational routines can be applied in empirical research to understand organizational change. We identify problems encountered in such research and present proposals for how to deal with them, in order to advance our knowledge of routines and our understanding of organizational change. Developing these themes, we also introduce the articles in the special section 'Towards an Operationalization of the Routines Concept'. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

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Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Industrial and Corporate Change.

Volume (Year): 14 (2005)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 775-791

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Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:14:y:2005:i:5:p:775-791
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  1. Nicolai J. Foss, 2001. "Selective Intervention and Internal HybridsInterpreting and Learning from the Rise and Decline of the Oticon Spaghetti Organization," DRUID Working Papers 01-16, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  2. Guellec, Dominique & Greenan, Nathalie & Caroli, Eve, 2001. "Organizational Change and Skill Accumulation," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10092, Paris Dauphine University.
  3. Markus Becker & Nathalie Lazaric, 2003. "The influence of knowledge in the replication of routines," Post-Print hal-00457124, HAL.
  4. Massini, Silvia & Lewin, Arie Y. & Numagami, Tsuyoshi & Pettigrew, Andrew M., 2002. "The evolution of organizational routines among large Western and Japanese firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1333-1348, December.
  5. Nathalie Lazaric & Alain Raybaut, 2004. "Knowledge creation facing hierarchy: the dynamics of groups inside the firm," Post-Print hal-00457106, HAL.
  6. Giovanni Dosi & Daniel A. Levinthal & Luigi Marengo, 2003. "Bridging contested terrain: linking incentive-based and learning perspectives on organizational evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 413-436, April.
  7. Becker, Markus C. & Knudsen, Thorbjorn, 2005. "The role of routines in reducing pervasive uncertainty," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(6), pages 746-757, June.
  8. Nelson, Richard R., 2003. "On the uneven evolution of human know-how," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 909-922, June.
  9. Nathalie Greenan, 2003. "Organisational change, technology, employment and skills: an empirical study of French manufacturing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 287-316, March.
  10. Goldstein, Don, 1997. "Clashing Paradigms? Total Quality, Financial Restructuring and Theories of the Firm," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(3), pages 665-700, September.
  11. Carley, Kathleen M., 1996. "A comparison of artificial and human organizations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 175-191, November.
  12. Martha S. Feldman, 2003. "A performative perspective on stability and change in organizational routines," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(4), pages 727-752, August.
  13. Witt, Ulrich, 1998. "Imagination and leadership - The neglected dimension of an evolutionary theory of the firm," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 161-177, April.
  14. Geoffrey M. Hodgson, 2003. "The Mystery of the Routine. The Darwinian Destiny of An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 54(2), pages 355-384.
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