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Institutional regimes and employee influence at work: a European comparison

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  • Duncan Gallie

Abstract

Employee's ability to exercise influence over their work tasks has long been seen as a critical aspect of the quality of work. Using comparative representative surveys, the paper examines how well the contrasting power resource and production regime theoretical perspectives account for the empirical differences between countries -- taking Denmark, Finland, Germany, the United Kingdom and Sweden as paradigmatic cases of different regime types. It examines individual task discretion, collective team decision-making and consultative influence through management. It reveals the distinctively high level of influence at work of employees in the Nordic countries, a pattern that is most consistent with power resources theory. Copyright 2009, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Duncan Gallie, 2009. "Institutional regimes and employee influence at work: a European comparison," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 2(3), pages 379-393.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:2:y:2009:i:3:p:379-393
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cjres/rsp010
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    Cited by:

    1. Krzywdzinski, Martin, 2017. "Accounting for Cross-Country Differences in Employee Involvement Practices: Comparative Case Studies in Germany, Brazil and China," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 321-346.
    2. Peter Muehlau, 2011. "Gender Inequality and Job Quality in Europe," management revue - Socio-Economic Studies, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 22(2), pages 114-131.
    3. Hauff, Sven & Kirchner, Stefan, 2014. "Changes in workplace situation and work values. Relations and dynamics within different employment regimes," management revue - Socio-Economic Studies, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 25(1), pages 27-49.
    4. Duncan Gallie, 2012. "Skills, Job Control and the Quality of Work:The Evidence from Britain Geary Lecture 2012," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(3), pages 325-341.

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