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Disability, job mismatch, earnings and job satisfaction in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Melanie Jones
  • Kostas Mavromaras
  • Peter Sloane
  • Zhang Wei

Abstract

We examine the relationship between disability, job mismatch, earnings and job satisfaction using panel estimation on data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (2001–08). While we do not find any relationship between work-limiting disability and overskilling, it appears that there is a positive relationship between work-limiting disability and overeducation, which is consistent with disability onset leading to downward occupational movement, at least in relative terms. We find a negative correlation between work-limiting disability and both earnings and job satisfaction. However, there is only evidence of a causal relationship in terms of the latter, where the impact of disability is found to be multifaceted.

Suggested Citation

  • Melanie Jones & Kostas Mavromaras & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2014. "Disability, job mismatch, earnings and job satisfaction in Australia," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(5), pages 1221-1246.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:38:y:2014:i:5:p:1221-1246.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/beu014
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    Cited by:

    1. Kavanagh, Anne M. & Aitken, Zoe & Baker, Emma & LaMontagne, Anthony D. & Milner, Allison & Bentley, Rebecca, 2016. "Housing tenure and affordability and mental health following disability acquisition in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 225-232.
    2. Jones, Melanie K. & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Sloane, Peter J. & Wei, Zhang, 2015. "The Dynamic Effect of Disability on Work and Subjective Wellbeing in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 9609, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Milner, A. & Krnjacki, L. & Butterworth, P. & Kavanagh, A. & LaMontagne, Anthony D., 2015. "Does disability status modify the association between psychosocial job quality and mental health? A longitudinal fixed-effects analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 104-111.
    4. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:10:p:1001-1015 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 24906.
    6. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Workplace Disability: Whose Wellbeing Does It Affect?," IZA Discussion Papers 10102, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. repec:bla:brjirl:v:56:y:2018:i:4:p:798-834 is not listed on IDEAS

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