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Capstone or deadweight? Inefficiency, duplication and inequity in South Africa's tertiary education system, 1910--93

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  • Johannes Fedderke
  • Raphael de Kadt
  • John Luiz

Abstract

This paper presents time series on South African tertiary education. The data series presented cover inputs and outputs for the university, technical training and teacher training systems. Modern growth theory has emphasised the importance of human capital, though empirical studies have attempted to isolate human capital impacts through single aggregate measures that capture only a quantity of human capital dimension. While data analysis in the present study is exploratory in nature, we show that strong quality differentials exist both within and between different parts of the tertiary education system. The methodological implication for growth studies is that fully accounting for both the quantity and quality of human capital in aggregate human capital measures thus faces significant measurement difficulties. The data also establish that discrimination in the South African tertiary education was not simply a question of underresourcing of Black institutions. Quality of output was low, but attaining it was frequently very expensive. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Johannes Fedderke & Raphael de Kadt & John Luiz, 2003. "Capstone or deadweight? Inefficiency, duplication and inequity in South Africa's tertiary education system, 1910--93," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 377-400, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:27:y:2003:i:3:p:377-400
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    Cited by:

    1. John m. Luiz, 2009. "Evaluating The Performance Of South African Economics Departments," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(4), pages 591-602, December.
    2. Johannes Fedderke & John Luiz & Raphael Kadt, 2008. "Using fractionalization indexes: deriving methodological principles for growth studies from time series evidence," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 85(2), pages 257-278, January.
    3. Fedderke, J.W. & Bogetic, Z., 2009. "Infrastructure and Growth in South Africa: Direct and Indirect Productivity Impacts of 19 Infrastructure Measures," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1522-1539, September.
    4. Haroon Bhorat & Ravi Kanbur, 2005. "Poverty and Well-being in Post-Apartheid South Africa: An Overview of Data, Outcomes and Policy," Working Papers 05101, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.

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