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Uncovering Discrimination: A Comparison of the Methods Used by Scholars and Civil Rights Enforcement Officials

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  • Stephen L. Ross
  • John Yinger

Abstract

The responsibility for uncovering discrimination falls on both scholars and civil rights enforcement officials. Scholars ask whether discrimination exists and why it arises; enforcement officials ask whether particular firms are discriminating. This article investigates the points of commonality and divergence in these two lines of inquiry. We demonstrate a need for more research focusing on discrimination as defined by the law and for more enforcement building on the methodological lessons in the research literature. We also show that disparate-impact discrimination cannot be identified with current enforcement tools but could be identified with methods in the scholarly literature. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

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  • Stephen L. Ross & John Yinger, 2006. "Uncovering Discrimination: A Comparison of the Methods Used by Scholars and Civil Rights Enforcement Officials," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(3), pages 562-614.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:amlawe:v:8:y:2006:i:3:p:562-614
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/aler/ahl015
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    Cited by:

    1. Bocian, Debbie Gruenstein & Ernst, Keith S. & Li, Wei, 2008. "Race, ethnicity and subprime home loan pricing," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 110-124.

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