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Cash Marketing Styles and Performance Persistence

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  • Lewis T. Cunningham
  • B. Wade Brorsen
  • Kim B. Anderson

Abstract

Much agricultural economics research has been dedicated to determining the best time for producers to sell their commodities. Unlike this past research, we look at how producers actually sell commodities. The extent to which producers display an active or mechanical marketing style is measured using individual farmer sales. The activeness of a producer's marketing strategy is measured by how much the timing of their strategy varies from year to year. Results show no relationship between activeness and net prices received. Furthermore, the results show no evidence of performance persistence by individual producers. Copyright 2007, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Lewis T. Cunningham & B. Wade Brorsen & Kim B. Anderson, 2007. "Cash Marketing Styles and Performance Persistence," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(3), pages 624-636.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:89:y:2007:i:3:p:624-636
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2007.00983.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Xin & Paulson, Nicholas, 2014. "Is Farm Management Skill Persistent?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170170, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Klumpp, Joni M. & Brorsen, B. Wade & Anderson, Kim B., 2005. "The Impact of Marketing Strategy Information on the Producer's Selling Decision," 2005 Conference, April 18-19, 2005, St. Louis, Missouri 19036, NCR-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management.
    3. Li, Xi & Paulson, Nicholas & Schnitkey, Gary, 2015. "Is Farm Management Skill Persistent?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212047, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Mattos, Fabio & Fryza, Stefanie A., 2012. "Marketing Contracts, Overconfidence, and Timing in the Canadian Wheat Market," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(3), December.

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