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Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy: How Many Stones Should be Used to Kill a Bird?

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  • Braathen, Nils Axel

Abstract

How many instruments should be used to address a particular environmental problem? That is the question this article addresses. According to the "Tinbergen rule," one instrument per target is needed. The existence of any non-environmental market failures affecting the environmental problem at hand will also require one additional instrument per market failure. However, detailed case studies reveal that it is no simple task to count neither the number of relevant targets, nor the number of instruments applied. While there are good reasons to apply several instruments in combination to address a given environmental problem (non-environmental market failures, "multi-aspect" character of many problems, cases where one instrument underpin the use of other instruments, the need to address non-environmental policy concerns, etc.), it is sometimes difficult to see that such arguments have been the main explanations for the instrument mixes in practical use. There are also cases where the environmental effectiveness or economic efficiency of an instrument mix is hampered by lacking instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Braathen, Nils Axel, 2007. "Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy: How Many Stones Should be Used to Kill a Bird?," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 1(2), pages 185-235, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:now:jirere:101.00000005
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000005
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lecuyer, Oskar & Quirion, Philippe, 2013. "Can uncertainty justify overlapping policy instruments to mitigate emissions?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 177-191.
    2. Vogt-Schilb, Adrien & Hallegatte, Stéphane, 2014. "Marginal abatement cost curves and the optimal timing of mitigation measures," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 645-653.
    3. Rogge, Karoline S. & Reichardt, Kristin, 2016. "Policy mixes for sustainability transitions: An extended concept and framework for analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1620-1635.
    4. Zylicz, Tomasz, 2010. "Goals and Principles of Environmental Policy," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 3(4), pages 299-334, May.
    5. Adrien Vogt-Schilb & Guy Meunier & Stéphane Hallegatte, 2012. "How inertia and limited potentials affect the timing of sectoral abatements in optimal climate policy," Post-Print hal-00722574, HAL.
    6. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00916328 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Adrien Vogt-Schilb & Stéphane Hallegatte, 2013. "When Starting with the Most Expensive Option Makes Sense On Marginal Abatement Cost Curves and Optimal Abatement Pathways," Working Papers hal-00626261, HAL.
    8. repec:cog:poango:v:5:y:2017:i:2:p:69-78 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Kristin Reichardt & Karoline S. Rogge & Simona Negro & Marko Hekkert, 2015. "Analyzing interdependencies between policy mixes and technological innovation systems: the case of offshore wind in Germany," Innovation Studies Utrecht (ISU) working paper series 15-04, Utrecht University, Department of Innovation Studies, revised Aug 2015.
    10. repec:eee:rensus:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:824-834 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Fischer, Carolyn & Preonas, Louis, 2010. "Combining Policies for Renewable Energy: Is the Whole Less Than the Sum of Its Parts?," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 4(1), pages 51-92, June.
    12. Rogge, Karoline S. & Reichardt, Kristin, 2013. "Towards a more comprehensive policy mix conceptualization for environmental technological change: A literature synthesis," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S3/2013, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    13. repec:hal:ciredw:hal-00916328 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Michael Howlett & Ishani Mukherjee & Jeremy Rayner, 2014. "The Elements of Effective Program Design: A Two-Level Analysis," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 2(2), pages 1-12.
    15. Oskar Lecuyer & Philippe Quirion, 2012. "Can Uncertainty Justify Overlapping Policy Instruments to Mitigate Emissions ?," Working Papers hal-00866440, HAL.
    16. Pablo Río, 2014. "On evaluating success in complex policy mixes: the case of renewable energy support schemes," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 47(3), pages 267-287, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Instrument mixes; Environmental policy; Ex post evaluations; Environmental effectiveness; Economic efficiency; Non-point sources of water pollution; Household waste; Energy efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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