IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Procyclical Multifactor Productivity: Tests of the Current Theories


  • Jun, Sangjoon


This paper conducts various tests of four hypotheses to account for procycical multifactor productivity. The hypotheses include imperfect competition, increasing returns to scale, labor hoarding, and thick market externalities. The test results provide strong evidence for imperfect competition and increasing returns, and weak evidence for labor hoarding and thick market externalities. However, the markup and returns to scale parameter estimates are much smaller than those noted in previous research. This difference results from the use here of gross output and intermediate inputs as opposed to the use in previous research of value added and primary inputs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jun, Sangjoon, 1998. "Procyclical Multifactor Productivity: Tests of the Current Theories," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 30(1), pages 51-63, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:51-63

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Duca, John V., 1990. "The impact of mortgage activity on recent demand deposit growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 157-161, February.
    2. Anderson, G J & Blundell, R W, 1982. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing in Dynamic Singular Equation Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1559-1571, November.
    3. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
    4. Peter C. B. Phillips & Mico Loretan, 1991. "Estimating Long-run Economic Equilibria," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 407-436.
    5. Schwert, G William, 2002. "Tests for Unit Roots: A Monte Carlo Investigation," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 5-17, January.
    6. Yock Y. Chong & David F. Hendry, 1986. "Econometric Evaluation of Linear Macro-Economic Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(4), pages 671-690.
    7. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin, 1992. "Liquidity Effects and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 346-353, May.
    8. William Barnett, 2005. "Monetary Aggregation," Macroeconomics 0503017, EconWPA.
    9. Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 1993. "A Simple Estimator of Cointegrating Vectors in Higher Order Integrated Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(4), pages 783-820, July.
    10. Duca, John V., 1995. "Should bond funds be added to M2?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 131-152, April.
    11. Anderson, G J, 1991. "Expenditure Allocation across Nondurables, Services, Durables and Savings: An Empirical Study of Separability in the Long Run," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(2), pages 153-168, April-Jun.
    12. Patrick I. Mahoney, 1988. "The recent behavior of demand deposits," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Apr, pages 195-208.
    13. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    14. Deaton,Angus & Muellbauer,John, 1980. "Economics and Consumer Behavior," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521296762, March.
    15. Ng, Serena, 1995. "Testing for Homogeneity in Demand Systems When the Regressors Are Nonstationary," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(2), pages 147-163, April-Jun.
    16. Ng, S. & Perron, P., 1994. "Unit Root Tests ARMA Models with Data Dependent Methods for the Selection of the Truncation Lag," Cahiers de recherche 9423, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    17. Serletis, Apostolos, 1991. "The Demand for Divisia Money in the United States: A Dynamic Flexible Demand System," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(1), pages 35-52, February.
    18. MacKinnon, James G, 1994. "Approximate Asymptotic Distribution Functions for Unit-Root and Cointegration Tests," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(2), pages 167-176, April.
    19. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
    20. Weale, Martin, 1986. "The Structure of Personal Sector Short-term Asset Holdings," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 54(2), pages 141-161, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Holger Görg & Frederic Warzynski, 2003. "Price Cost Margins and Exporting Behaviour: Evidence from Firm Level Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 365, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Jozef Konings & Patrick Van Cayseele & Frédéric Warzynski, 2010. "The Implementation of National Competition Policy Law and the Dynamics of Price–Cost Margins: Evidence from Belgium and the Netherlands 1993–1999," Chapters,in: Innovation, Economic Growth and the Firm, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Konings, Jozef & Van Cayseele, Patrick & Warzynski, Frederic, 2001. "The dynamics of industrial mark-ups in two small open economies: does national competition policy matter?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 841-859, April.
    4. Miguel Jimenez & Domenico J. Marchetti, 2000. "Interpreting the Procyclical Productivity of Manufacturing Sectors: Can We Really Rule Out External Effects:," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1319, Econometric Society.
    5. Warzynski, Frederic, 2001. "Did tough antitrust policy lead to lower mark-ups in the US manufacturing industry?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 139-144, January.
    6. Nicholas Apergis & Stephen M. Miller, 2007. "Total Factor Productivity and Monetary Policy: Evidence from Conditional Volatility," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(2), pages 131-152, July.
    7. Siotis, Georges, 2003. "Competitive pressure and economic integration: an illustration for Spain, 1983-1996," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 21(10), pages 1435-1459, December.
    8. Edward Oczkowski & Kishor Sharma, 2001. "Imperfect Competition, Returns To Scale and Productivity Growth In Australian Manufacturing: A Smooth Transition Approach To Trade Liberalisation," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 99-113, June.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:51-63. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.