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Fiscal Trends in Real Economic Aggregates

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  • Ahmed, Shaghil
  • Yoo, Byung Sam

Abstract

Using cointegration analysis, the authors examine long-term interactions between fiscal variables and the consumption-output and leisure-labor ratios. The motivation is to test if fiscal trends are an independent source of stochastic trends underlying the long-run behavior of real economic aggregates. The authors' results support the presence of fiscal trends and can be interpreted quite well in terms of the equilibrium approach to fiscal policy. They suggest that neoclassical growth models that embed fiscal trends and distinguish between components of government purchases are more consistent with the data than simple real-business-cycle models. Copyright 1995 by Ohio State University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmed, Shaghil & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1995. "Fiscal Trends in Real Economic Aggregates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 985-1001, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:27:y:1995:i:4:p:985-1001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Benjamin M. Friedman, 1972. "Credit rationing: a review," Staff Studies 72, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. King, Stephen R, 1986. "Monetary Transmission: Through Bank Loans or Bank Liabilities?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(3), pages 290-303, August.
    10. William P. Osterberg, 1990. "Bank capital requirements and leverage: a review of the literature," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q IV, pages 2-12.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simon Wiederhold, 2009. "Government Spending Composition in a Simple Model of Schumpeterian Growth," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-101, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    2. Hafedh Bouakez & Nooman Rebei, 2007. "Why does private consumption rise after a government spending shock?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(3), pages 954-979, August.
    3. Kia, Amir, 2006. "Deficits, debt financing, monetary policy and inflation in developing countries: Internal or external factors?: Evidence from Iran," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 879-903, November.
    4. K Peren Arin & Faik Koray, 2005. "Fiscal Policy and Economic Activity: U.S. Evidence," Macroeconomics 0508024, EconWPA.
    5. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay & Joan Esteban, 2009. "Redistributive Taxation, Public Expenditure, and Size of Governent," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 799.09, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    6. Francis, Neville & Ramey, Valerie A., 2005. "Is the technology-driven real business cycle hypothesis dead? Shocks and aggregate fluctuations revisited," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 1379-1399.
    7. Amir Kia, 2006. "Deficits, Debt Financing, Monetary Policy and Inflation in Developing Countries: Internal or External Factors? Evidence from Iran," Carleton Economic Papers 06-03, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2006.
    8. Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra & Esteban, Joan, 2007. "Redistributive taxation and public expenditures," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6537, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Joan Esteban & Laura Mayoral, 2013. "A Politico-Economic Model of Public Expenditure and Income Taxation," Working Papers 743, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    10. Amir Kia, 2004. "Deficits, Debt Financing, Monetary Policy and Inflation in Developing Countries: Internal or External Factors?," Carleton Economic Papers 04-15, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    11. Simon Wiederhold, 2012. "The Role of Public Procurement in Innovation: Theory and Empirical Evidence," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 43.
    12. CARDIA, Emanuela & KOZHAYA, Norma & RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco J., 1999. "Distortionary Taxation and Labor Supply: Evidence from Canada," Cahiers de recherche 9913, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    13. Neville Francis & Valerie A. Ramey, 2002. "Is the Technology-Driven Real Business Cycle Hypothesis Dead?," NBER Working Papers 8726, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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