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Chaebol, Investment Opportunity Set and Corporate Debt and Dividend Policies of Korean Companies

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  • Gul, Ferdinand A
  • Kealey, Burch T

Abstract

This paper examines explanations for the association between Korean Chaebol, which are giant conglomerates supported by various government initiatives, and corporate debt and dividend policies. Unlike in the US, the Korean corporate sector is dominated by the Chaebol which are characterized by concentrated family ownership, political affiliation and bank ownership. These institutional arrangements are likely to encourage more debt financing. In addition, the study also investigates whether firms with more growth options measured in terms of the investment opportunity set (IOS) have lower leverage and dividends. Results using observations from 411 Korean firms showed that for a fixed level of growth opportunities, Chaebol carry higher levels of debt. Results also show that growth options were negatively associated with leverage and dividends. No association, however, was found between Chaebol and dividends. Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Gul, Ferdinand A & Kealey, Burch T, 1999. "Chaebol, Investment Opportunity Set and Corporate Debt and Dividend Policies of Korean Companies," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 401-416, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:13:y:1999:i:4:p:401-16
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Abor & Godfred A. Bokpin, 2010. "Investment opportunities, corporate finance, and dividend payout policy: Evidence from emerging markets," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(3), pages 180-194, August.
    2. Ferris, Stephen P. & Kim, Kenneth A. & Kitsabunnarat, Pattanaporn, 2003. "The costs (and benefits?) of diversified business groups: The case of Korean chaebols," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 251-273, February.
    3. Basil Al-Najjar, 2009. "Dividend behaviour and smoothing new evidence from Jordanian panel data," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 26(3), pages 182-197, July.
    4. Flavin, Thomas & O'Connor, Thomas, 2017. "Reputation building and the lifecycle model of dividends," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, pages 177-190.

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