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Veterans Interests and the Transition to Government Growth: 1870-1915

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  • Holcombe, Randall G

Abstract

Civil War veterans were the first interest group to use their political power to obtain substantial monetary transfers from the U.S. Treasury. Veterans supported the Republican party and, in exchange, Republicans provided increasingly generous veterans benefits, placing a strain on the Treasury that led toward a demand for increased taxes. Veterans also established a precedent that other groups could follow to petition the government for economic benefits, shaping the transformation of American government in the Progressive Era which led to the substantial growth of the federal government in the twentieth century. Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Holcombe, Randall G, 1999. "Veterans Interests and the Transition to Government Growth: 1870-1915," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 99(3-4), pages 311-326, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:99:y:1999:i:3-4:p:311-26
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    Cited by:

    1. Danko Tarabar & Joshua C. Hall, 2015. "The Seventeenth Amendment, Senate ideology and the growth of government," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(8), pages 637-640, May.
    2. Hugh Rockoff, 2001. "The Changing Role of America’s Veterans," Departmental Working Papers 200113, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    3. Thomas A. Garrett & Andrew F. Kozak & Russell M. Rhine, 2010. "Institutions and government growth: a comparison of the 1890s and the 1930s," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 109-120.
    4. Joshua C. Hall & Kaitlyn R. Harger, 2014. "Teaching Students to "Do" Public Choice in an Undergraduate Public Sector Course," Working Papers 14-16, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    5. Russell Sobel & Matt Ryan, 2012. "Seniority and anti-competitive restrictions on the legislative common pool: tenure’s impact on the overall production of legislation and the concentration of political benefits," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 153(1), pages 171-190, October.

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