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Free Riders or Easy Riders?: An Examination of the Voluntary Provision of Public Radio

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  • Brunner, Eric J

Abstract

This paper tests the widely accepted hypothesis that, when a pure public good is voluntarily provided, incentives to free ride increase with the number of individuals consuming the good. Specifically, the author uses unique data on the number of listeners and contributors to public radio to test two hypotheses. First he tests whether the proportion of contributors falls as group size increases and, second, the author tests whether contributions per contributor falls as group size increases. He finds that increases in group size result in significantly more free riding. However, the author also finds that group size has no effect on contributions per contributor. Copyright 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Brunner, Eric J, 1998. "Free Riders or Easy Riders?: An Examination of the Voluntary Provision of Public Radio," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(4), pages 587-604, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:97:y:1998:i:4:p:587-604
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    Cited by:

    1. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Laura Juarez, 2015. "Old-Age Government Transfers and the Crowding Out of Private Gifts: The 70 and Above Program for the Rural Elderly in Mexico," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 782-802, January.
    2. Gaube, Thomas, 2006. "Altruism and charitable giving in a fully replicated economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(8-9), pages 1649-1667, September.
    3. Makoto Kakinaka & Koji Kotani, 2011. "An interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations on voluntary contributions to a public good in a large economy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 29-41, April.
    4. Brunner, Eric & Sonstelie, Jon, 2003. "School finance reform and voluntary fiscal federalism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(9-10), pages 2157-2185, September.
    5. Martha Kropf, 2009. "Won't You Be My Neighbor? Norms of Cooperation, Public Broadcasting, and the Collective Action Problem," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 90(3), pages 538-552.
    6. Dennis Halcoussis & Anton Lowenberg, 2003. "The quantity and quality of radio broadcasting: are small markets underprovided?," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 347-357.
    7. Ignacio Abásolo & Aki Tsuchiya, 2014. "Blood donation as a public good: an empirical investigation of the free rider problem," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(3), pages 313-321, April.
    8. Ignacio Abásolo & Aki Tsuchiya, 2012. "Blood Donation as a Public Good: An Empirical Investigation of the Free-Rider," Working Papers 2012004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:eee:ecmode:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:409-415 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Thomas Gaube, 2005. "Altruism and charitable giving in a fully replicated economy," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2005_8, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    11. Yung Yau, 2011. "Willingness to Participate in Collective Action: The Case of Multi-owner Housing Management," ERES eres2011_155, European Real Estate Society (ERES).

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