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Democracy and Development: A Theoretical Framework

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  • Azam, Jean-Paul

Abstract

A simple framework is set up to discuss the relationship between democracy, material welfare, and development. Democracy is regarded both as a good in its own right and as an input in the production of material welfare. The optimum level of democracy is then related to the level of development. At the optimum point, the marginal cost of democracy in terms of foregone output is positive and growth is a decreasing function of the level of democracy. Deviations from the optimum path are described as either repressive or populist. Democratization is not unambiguously an optimal response to exogenous shocks. Copyright 1994 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Azam, Jean-Paul, 1994. "Democracy and Development: A Theoretical Framework," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 80(3-4), pages 293-305, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:80:y:1994:i:3-4:p:293-305
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wallace E. Oates, 1999. "An Essay on Fiscal Federalism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1120-1149, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Claude Berthélemy & Jean-Paul Azam & Stéphane Calipel & Claude Jessua, 1996. "Risque politique et croissance en Afrique," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(3), pages 819-829.
    2. Block, Steven A., 2002. "Political business cycles, democratization, and economic reform: the case of Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 205-228, February.
    3. Claude Diebolt & Tapas Mishra & Bazoumana Ouattara & Mamata Parhi, 2010. "Does democratic distance matter for cross-country growth interdependence?," Working Papers 10-12, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    4. Lorenzo Rocco & Zié Ballo, 2008. "Provoking a civil war," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 347-366, March.
    5. Banerji, Arup & Ghanem, Hafez, 1995. "Political regimes, trade, and labor policies in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1521, The World Bank.

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