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Implicit Taxes Collected by State Liquor Monopolies

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  • Benson, Bruce L
  • Rasmussen, David W
  • Zimmerman, Paul R

Abstract

State monopolization or taxation are supposedly justified because of negative externalities from alcohol consumption, but recent research questions the efficacy of such policies, suggesting that their actual goals may be revenue-generation. Consideration of this hypothesis is facilitated by estimates of the implicit taxes charged in monopoly states, which generally are substantially higher than taxes in non-monopoly states. Evidence that monopolization and high taxes do not affect the level of externalities is also explained by adjustments that rational individuals make to avoid the consequences of such policies, thus providing further support for the revenue-maximization hypothesis. Copyright 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Benson, Bruce L & Rasmussen, David W & Zimmerman, Paul R, 2003. "Implicit Taxes Collected by State Liquor Monopolies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 115(3-4), pages 313-331, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:115:y:2003:i:3-4:p:313-31
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    Cited by:

    1. Ruhm, Christopher J. & Jones, Alison Snow & McGeary, Kerry Anne & Kerr, William C. & Terza, Joseph V. & Greenfield, Thomas K. & Pandian, Ravi S., 2012. "What U.S. data should be used to measure the price elasticity of demand for alcohol?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 851-862.
    2. repec:eme:jepppp:jepp-02-2016-0004 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zimmerman, Paul R. & Benson, Bruce L., 2007. "Alcohol and rape: An "economics-of-crime" perspective," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 442-473, December.
    4. Ho, Shuay-Tsyr & Qu, Mingyang & Rickard, Bradley & Costanigro, Marco & McLaughlin, Edward, 2016. "Retail Alcohol Availability and Product Diversity," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235913, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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