IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/poprpr/v34y2015i1p113-139.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Bucking the Trend: Is Ethnoracial Diversity Declining in American Communities?

Author

Listed:
  • Barrett Lee

    ()

  • Lauren Hughes

Abstract

Although increasing diversity at the national scale is a well-documented trend, substantial variation in patterns of ethnoracial change occurs across American communities. Our research considers one theoretically implied path: that some communities are ‘bucking the trend,’ becoming more homogeneous over time. Using 1980 through 2010 decennial census data, we calculate panethnic (five-group) entropy index scores to measure the magnitude of diversity for nearly 11,000 census-defined places. Our results indicate that while certain places reach their diversity peak in 1980 or 1990, they are few in number. Moreover, they experience a variety of post-peak trajectories other than monotonic diversity decline. Decreasing diversity is concentrated in the South and West, among places with higher levels of diversity and larger proportions of Hispanic or black residents at the beginning of the study period. These places exhibit complex shifts in racial–ethnic structure, but Hispanic succession predominates. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Barrett Lee & Lauren Hughes, 2015. "Bucking the Trend: Is Ethnoracial Diversity Declining in American Communities?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(1), pages 113-139, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:34:y:2015:i:1:p:113-139
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-014-9343-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-014-9343-8
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Avery Guest, 1973. "Urban growth and population densities," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 10(1), pages 53-69, February.
    2. Stephen L. Ross & John Yinger, 2002. "The Color of Credit: Mortgage Discrimination, Research Methodology, and Fair-Lending Enforcement," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262182289, October.
    3. Matthew Hall & Barrett Lee, 2010. "How Diverse Are US Suburbs?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(1), pages 3-28, January.
    4. Daniel Lichter, 2013. "Integration or Fragmentation? Racial Diversity and the American Future," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 359-391, April.
    5. Charles Hirschman, 2005. "Immigration and the American century," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 595-620, November.
    6. Jeremy Pais & Scott South & Kyle Crowder, 2009. "White Flight Revisited: A Multiethnic Perspective on Neighborhood Out-Migration," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(3), pages 321-346, June.
    7. Richard Alba & John Logan, 1991. "Variations on two themes: Racial and ethnic patterns in the attainment of suburban residence," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(3), pages 431-453, August.
    8. Kenneth M. Johnson & Daniel T. Lichter, 2008. "Natural Increase: A New Source of Population Growth in Emerging Hispanic Destinations in the United States," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(2), pages 327-346.
    9. Barrett Lee & Peter Wood, 1991. "Is neighborhood racial succession place-specific?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(1), pages 21-40, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kenneth M. Johnson & Daniel T. Lichter, 2016. "Diverging Demography: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Contributions to U.S. Population Redistribution and Diversity," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(5), pages 705-725, October.
    2. Christopher S. Fowler & Barrett A. Lee & Stephen A. Matthews, 2016. "The Contributions of Places to Metropolitan Ethnoracial Diversity and Segregation: Decomposing Change Across Space and Time," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 1955-1977, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Race; Ethnicity; Diversity; Census places; Entropy index;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:34:y:2015:i:1:p:113-139. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.