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The effect of circuit breakers on expected volatility: Tests using implied volatilities

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  • Lucy Ackert
  • Jonathan Hao
  • William Hunter

Abstract

Following the 1987 stock market crash, trading controls or circuit breakers were implemented in financial markets to moderate extreme volatility. However, the effectiveness of circuit breakers on the operation of these markets is disputed. While some argue that circuit breakers curb the effects of overreaction in markets and restore confidence, others argue that these trading interruptions merely delay price movements to later periods or to other markets. This paper examines the effect of changes in circuit breaker rules on the market's expectation of future volatility. The results have policy implications and suggest that the circuit breaker rule changes have no effect on expected volatility. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 1997

Suggested Citation

  • Lucy Ackert & Jonathan Hao & William Hunter, 1997. "The effect of circuit breakers on expected volatility: Tests using implied volatilities," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 25(2), pages 117-127, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:25:y:1997:i:2:p:117-127 DOI: 10.1007/BF02298379
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1994. " Circuit Breakers and Market Volatility: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 237-254, March.
    8. Black, Fischer & Scholes, Myron S, 1973. "The Pricing of Options and Corporate Liabilities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 637-654, May-June.
    9. Gerety, Mason S & Mulherin, J Harold, 1992. " Trading Halts and Market Activity: An Analysis of Volume at the Open and the Close," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(5), pages 1765-1784, December.
    10. James G. MacKinnon, 1990. "Critical Values for Cointegration Tests," Working Papers 1227, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
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