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The Effect of the UK Coalition Government's Tax and Benefit Changes on Household Incomes and Work Incentives

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  • Stuart Adam
  • James Browne
  • William Elming

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  • Stuart Adam & James Browne & William Elming, 2015. "The Effect of the UK Coalition Government's Tax and Benefit Changes on Household Incomes and Work Incentives," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 36, pages 375-402, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:36:y:2015:i::p:375-402
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    Cited by:

    1. De Agostini, Paula & Hills, John & Sutherland, Holly, 2018. "Were we really all in it together? The distributional effects of the 2010-2015 UK Coalition government's tax-benefit policy changes," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 82895, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Mike Brewer & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2016. "Accounting for Changes in Income Inequality: Decomposition Analyses for the UK, 1978–2008," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(3), pages 289-322, June.
    3. Michael Savage, 2017. "Integrated Modelling of the Impact of Direct and Indirect Taxes Using Complementary Datasets," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 171-205.
    4. Wren, Maev-Ann & Connolly, Sheelah, 2016. "Challenges in Achieving Universal Healthcare in Ireland," Papers BP2017/1, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    5. Lockwood, Matthew, 2016. "The UK's Levy Control Framework for renewable electricity support: Effects and significance," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 193-201.
    6. Callan, Tim & O'Dea, Cormac & Roantree, Barra & Savage, Michael, 2016. "Financial Incentives to Work: Comparing Ireland and the UK," Papers BP2017/2, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. Agustin Redonda, 2016. "Tax Expenditures and Sustainability. An Overview," Discussion Notes 1603, Council on Economic Policies.

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