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The Welfare Performance Of Sequential Pricing Mechanisms

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  • Eugenio J. Miravete

Abstract

Consumers are commonly required to subscribe to particular tariff options before uncertainty regarding their future purchases gets resolved. Since the general comparison of welfare performance of different pricing mechanisms is ambiguous, this article empirically evaluates the expected welfare associated with standard nonlinear pricing and optional tariffs by using information directly linked to the type of individual consumers. Results show that tariffs composed of nonlinear options do not necessarily outperform simpler pricing strategies in terms of expected profits. Furthermore, evidence suggests that a menu of optional two-part tariffs dominates any other pricing strategy from an expected welfare perspective. Copyright 2005 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenio J. Miravete, 2005. "The Welfare Performance Of Sequential Pricing Mechanisms ," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1321-1360, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:46:y:2005:i:4:p:1321-1360
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    Cited by:

    1. Chenghuan Sean Chu, 2010. "The effect of satellite entry on cable television prices and product quality," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 41(4), pages 730-764.
    2. Benjamin A. Olken & Patrick Barron, 2009. "The Simple Economics of Extortion: Evidence from Trucking in Aceh," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(3), pages 417-452, June.
    3. Imhof, Lorens & Kräkel, Matthias, 2014. "Bonus pools and the informativeness principle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 180-191.
    4. Miravete, Eugenio J, 2004. "Are all those Calling Plans Really Necessary? The Limited Gains From Complex Tariffs," CEPR Discussion Papers 4237, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Eugenio J. Miravete, 2004. "The Doubtful Profitability of Foggy Pricing," Working Papers 04-07, NET Institute.
    6. Michael D. Grubb, 2009. "Selling to Overconfident Consumers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(5), pages 1770-1807, December.
    7. Inderst, Roman & Peitz, Martin, 2012. "Informing consumers about their own preferences," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 417-428.
    8. Miravete, Eugenio J., 2011. "Convolution and composition of totally positive random variables in economics," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(4-5), pages 479-490.
    9. Erzo F.P. Luttmer & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2008. "Schedule Selection by Agents: from Price Plans to Tax Tables," NBER Working Papers 13808, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Inderst, Roman & Peitz, Martin, 2008. "Selling Service Plans to Differentially Informed Customers," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-125, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    11. Kakuya Matsushima & Kiyoshi Kobayashi, 2012. "Economic Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Discounting Fee Systems," Chapters,in: The Regional Economics of Knowledge and Talent, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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