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International Trade Rules and Environmental Cooperation under Asymmetric Information

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  • Ludema, Rodney D
  • Wooton, Ian

Abstract

With asymmetric information about local costs relative to international benefits of direct environmental policy, countries will rely too heavily on trade policy in controlling cross-border externalities in negotiated agreements. The unilateral externality policy chosen before negotiations by an exporter provides a signal about its local cost, modifying the information used in negotiations. The greater the exporter's incentive to use an externality tax as a second-best trade instrument, the better the signal. Consequently, exogenous limits on the unilateral use of trade policy in the absence of environmental cooperation can diminish the informational problem and improve the performance of prospective environmental agreements. Copyright 1997 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Ludema, Rodney D & Wooton, Ian, 1997. "International Trade Rules and Environmental Cooperation under Asymmetric Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(3), pages 605-625, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:38:y:1997:i:3:p:605-25
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    Cited by:

    1. Ferrara, Ida & Missios, Paul & Murat Yildiz, Halis, 2009. "Trading rules and the environment: Does equal treatment lead to a cleaner world?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 206-225, September.
    2. Engel, Stefanie, 2004. "Achieving environmental goals in a world of trade and hidden action: the role of trade policies and eco-labeling," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 1122-1145, November.
    3. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2002. "Reforms of Environmental Policies in the Presence of Cross-border Pollution and two Stage Clean Up," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 0203, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    4. Ulph, Alistair, 2000. "Harmonization and Optimal Environmental Policy in a Federal System with Asymmetric Information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 224-241, March.
    5. Costas Hadjiyiannis & Panos Hatzipanayotou & Michael S. Michael, 2002. "Optimal Tax Policies with Private-Public Clean-Up, Cross-Border Pollution and Capital Mobility," CESifo Working Paper Series 822, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Rodney D. Ludema & Taizo Takeno, 2007. "Tariffs and the adoption of clean technology under asymmetric information," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1100-1117, November.
    7. Norimichi Matsueda, 2002. "Asymmetrical information and delay of a side payment in unidirectional transboundary pollution," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 5(3), pages 229-247, September.
    8. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael Michael, 2008. "Cross-Border Pollution, Terms of Trade, and Welfare," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(3), pages 327-345, November.
    9. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2002. "Can cross-border pollution reduce pollution?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 805-818, November.
    10. Costas Hadjiyiannis & Panos Hatzipanayotou & Michael S. Michael, 2004. "Pollution and Capital Tax Competition within a Regional Block," CESifo Working Paper Series 1208, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Robert W. Staiger & Alan O. Sykes, 2009. "International Trade and Domestic Regulation," NBER Working Papers 15541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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