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The Work Effort and the Consumption of Immigrants as a Function of Their Assimilation

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  • Schaeffer, Peter V

Abstract

Positive self-selection has been used to explain the superior economic performance of some immigrant groups. Even if immigrants and natives are identical, however, the former face different incentives. In particular, they bear costs not incurred by natives, including monetary costs of moving, costs of staying in touch with family, and obligations to those left behind. Nonmonetary costs include stress and loss of location specific human capital. The focus of this paper is on how these costs influence the decisions of immigrants relative to those of natives. Particular attention is given to the role of assimilation. Copyright 1995 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Schaeffer, Peter V, 1995. "The Work Effort and the Consumption of Immigrants as a Function of Their Assimilation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(3), pages 625-642, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:36:y:1995:i:3:p:625-42
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    Cited by:

    1. François-Charles Wolff & Mohamed Jellal, 2003. "International migration and human capital formation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(10), pages 1-8.
    2. Jellal, Mohamed, 2014. "Diaspora et comportement économique en incertitude
      [Diaspora and economic behavior under uncertainty]
      ," MPRA Paper 57236, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Schiff, Maurice, 1999. "Trade, migration, and welfare : the impact of social capital," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2044, The World Bank.
    4. Jellal, Mohamed & Bouzahzah, Mohamed, 2012. "Diaspora parité du pouvoir d'achat incertitude et épargne," MPRA Paper 38746, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Vaira-Lucero, Matias & Nahm, Daehoon & Tani, Massimiliano, 2012. "Socioeconomic Assimilation and Wealth Accumulation of Migrants in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 6969, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2003:i:10:p:1-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Stark, Oded, 2002. "On a Variation in the Economic Performance of Migrants by their Home Country's Wage," MPRA Paper 21682, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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