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The Impact of Public Information on Phishing Attack and Defense

Author

Listed:
  • Tyler MOORE

    (Harvard University)

  • Richard CLAYTON

    (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

Attackers compromise web servers in order to host fraudulent content, such as malware and phishing websites. While the techniques used to compromise websites are widely discussed and categorized, analysis of the methods used by attackers to identify targets has remained anecdotal. In this paper, we study the use of search engines to locate potentially vulnerable hosts. We present empirical evidence from the logs of websites used for phishing to demonstrate attackers' widespread use of search terms which seek out susceptible web servers. We establish that at least 18% of website compromises are triggered by these searches. Many websites are repeatedly compromised however the root cause of the vulnerability is not addressed. We find that 17% of phishing websites are recompromised within a year, and the rate of recompromise is much higher if they have been identified through web search. By contrast, other public sources of information about phishing websites actually lower recompromise rates. We find that phishing websites placed onto a public blacklist are recompromised less often than websites only known within closed communities. Consequently, we conclude that strategic disclosure of incident information can actually aid defenders if designed properly.

Suggested Citation

  • Tyler MOORE & Richard CLAYTON, 2011. "The Impact of Public Information on Phishing Attack and Defense," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(81), pages 45-68, 1st quart.
  • Handle: RePEc:idt:journl:cs8102
    as

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    File URL: http://repec.idate.org/RePEc/idt/journl/CS8102/CS81_MOORE_CLAYTON.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tyler Moore & Richard Clayton & Ross Anderson, 2009. "The Economics of Online Crime," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(3), pages 3-20, Summer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    security economics; online crime; phishing; transparency;

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • L86 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Information and Internet Services; Computer Software

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