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Which Daily Price is Less Noisy?

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  • Christopher Ting

Abstract

The daily efficient price is the price that would prevail if the market were frictionless. I show that volume-weighted average price (VWAP) provides a less noisy estimate for the unobservable efficient price as compared to the closing price. The variance of daily returns computed with VWAPs is smaller than that computed with closing prices. The difference between these two realized variances is economically significant. The volatility of log closing price change tends to understate the beta risk and Sharpe ratio. A higher noise level in the closing price leads to derivative prices that favor option and volatility-related swap writers.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Ting, 2006. "Which Daily Price is Less Noisy?," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 35(3), Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:fma:fmanag:ting06
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    Cited by:

    1. Thu Phuong Pham, 2015. "Broker ID transparency and price impact of trades: evidence from the Korean Exchange," International Journal of Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 117-131, February.
    2. Edward W. Sun & Timm Kruse, 2013. "Economic Modeling for Optimal Trading of Financial Asset in Volatile Market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1788-1795.
    3. Thibaut Moyaert & Mikael Petitjean, 2011. "The performance of popular stochastic volatility option pricing models during the subprime crisis," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(14), pages 1059-1068.
    4. Chou, Robin K. & Wang, George H.K. & Wang, Yun-Yi & Bjursell, Johan, 2011. "The impacts of large trades by trader types on intraday futures prices: Evidence from the Taiwan Futures Exchange," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 41-70, January.
    5. Hu, Gang, 2009. "Measures of implicit trading costs and buy-sell asymmetry," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 418-437, August.
    6. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 4, June.

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