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Raising Capital Using Monthly Income Preferred Stock: Market Reaction and Implications for Capital Structure Theory


  • Paul Irvine
  • James Rosenfeld


We examine the impact of selling Monthly Income Preferred Stock (MIPS) on the common share prices of the issuing firms. We find that issuing MIPS to retire preferred stock raises the value of the firm, and that government policy can significantly affect the present value of the tax savings. Using proceeds to retire bank loans negatively impacts common share value. This negative response is larger for MIPS users with lower credit ratings on their senior debt. These findings support the view that banks perform a valuable monitoring service, which, if removed, can invoke an adverse market reaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Irvine & James Rosenfeld, 2000. "Raising Capital Using Monthly Income Preferred Stock: Market Reaction and Implications for Capital Structure Theory," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 29(2), Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:fma:fmanag:irvine00

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael S. Rozeff, 1998. "Stock Splits: Evidence from Mutual Funds," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(1), pages 335-349, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nandkumar Nayar, 2014. "Lyon Taming by the IRS: Evidence on Tax Deductions," EcoMod2014 7163, EcoMod.
    2. Stewart C. Myers, 2001. "Capital Structure," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 81-102, Spring.
    3. Howe, John S. & Lee, Hongbok, 2006. "The long-run stock performance of preferred stock issuers," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 237-250.
    4. O. Emre Ergungor & C. N. V. Krishnan & Ajai K. Singh & Allan A. Zebedee, 2004. "Bank seasoned equity offers: do voluntary and involuntary offers differ?," Working Paper 0414, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    5. George J. Benston & Paul Irvine & Jim Rosenfeld & Joseph F. Sinkey, 2000. "Bank capital structure, regulatory capital, and securities innovations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2000-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Ravid, S. Abraham & Venezia, Itzhak & Ofer, Aharon & Pons, Vicente & Zuta, Shlomith, 2007. "When are preferred shares preferred? Theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 198-237, October.

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