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Who really made your car?

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas H. Klier
  • James M. Rubenstein

Abstract

In the past few decades, the evolving relations between automakers and their parts suppliers have resulted in shifts in the location of production across North America. The authors explore the ongoing structural changes to the automotive industry and explain their local, regional, and international implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas H. Klier & James M. Rubenstein, 2008. "Who really made your car?," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Oct.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhle:y:2008:i:oct:n:255a
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    File URL: http://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/chicago_fed_letter/2008/cfloctober2008_255a.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcella Nicolini & Carlo Scarpa & Paola Valbonesi, 2013. "Aiding Car Producers in the EU: Money in Search of a Strategy," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 67-87, March.
    2. Azadian, Farshid & Murat, Alper E. & Chinnam, Ratna Babu, 2012. "Dynamic routing of time-sensitive air cargo using real-time information," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 355-372.
    3. Nicholas Crafts & Alexander Klein, 2017. "A Long-Run Perspective on the Spatial Concentration of Manufacturing Industries in the United States," Studies in Economics 1715, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    4. Richard Baldwin, 2013. "Trade and Industrialization after Globalization's Second Unbundling: How Building and Joining a Supply Chain Are Different and Why It Matters," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in an Age of Crisis: Multilateral Economic Cooperation in the Twenty-First Century, pages 165-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Richard Baldwin, 2011. "Trade And Industrialisation After Globalisation's 2nd Unbundling: How Building And Joining A Supply Chain Are Different And Why It Matters," NBER Working Papers 17716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Frigant, Vincent, 2014. "Une comparaison de la fragmentation internationale des chaînes d’approvisionnement automobiles allemande et française," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 15.
    7. Lara Rivero Arturo Ángel, 2014. "De sistema mecánico a sistema tecnológico complejo. El caso de los automóviles," Contaduría y Administración, Accounting and Management, vol. 59(2), pages 11-39, abril-jun.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automobile supplies industry;

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