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Bank relationships and the depth of the current economic crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Julian Caballero
  • Christopher Candelaria
  • Galina Hale

Abstract

The financial crisis has been worldwide in scope, but the severity has differed from country to country. Those countries whose banks played a more central role in the global financial system, were important intermediaries, or had extensive direct relationships tended to be less seriously affected, as measured by the extent of the decline in their stock markets in 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian Caballero & Christopher Candelaria & Galina Hale, 2009. "Bank relationships and the depth of the current economic crisis," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue dec14.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2009:i:dec14:n:2009-38
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    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2009/el2009-38.html
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paulo Bastos & Nicolas L. Bottan & Julian Cristia, 2017. "Access to Preprimary Education and Progression in Primary School: Evidence from Rural Guatemala," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, pages 521-547.
    2. Galina Hale, 2011. "Evidence on financial globalization and crisis: capital raisings," Working Paper Series 2011-04, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    3. Hale, Galina, 2012. "Bank relationships, business cycles, and financial crises," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 312-325.
    4. Makoto Nirei & Vladyslav Sushko & Julián Caballero, 2016. "Bank Capital Shock Propagation via Syndicated Interconnectedness," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 67-96, January.
    5. Camelia Minoiu & Chanhyun Kang & V.S. Subrahmanian & Anamaria Berea, 2015. "Does financial connectedness predict crises?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 607-624, April.
    6. Iustina Alina Boitan, 2015. "Output Loss Severity across EU Countries. Evidence for the 2008 Financial Crisis," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 11(4), pages 117-126, August.
    7. Caballero, Julian, 2015. "Banking crises and financial integration: Insights from networks science," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 127-146.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks and banking ; Financial crises;

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