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Monetary policy and asset price bubbles


  • Glenn D. Rudebusch


The appropriate monetary policy response to an asset price bubble remains unclear and is one of the most contentious issues currently facing central banks. Some have argued that monetary policy should be used to contain or reduce an asset price bubble in order to alleviate its adverse consequences on the economy, while others have argued that such a policy would be both impractical and unproductive given real-world uncertainties about the nature or even existence of bubbles. This Economic Letter examines how policymakers might choose between alternative courses of action when confronted with a possible asset price bubble.

Suggested Citation

  • Glenn D. Rudebusch, 2005. "Monetary policy and asset price bubbles," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue aug5.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2005:i:aug5:n:2005-18

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko & Raven E. Saks, 2005. "Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 329-333, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Drobyshevsky Sergey & Narkevich Sergey & E. Pikulina & D. Polevoy, 2009. "Analysis Of a Possible Bubble On the Russian Real Estate Market," Research Paper Series, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, issue 128.
    2. Andrea Ferrero, 2015. "House Price Booms, Current Account Deficits, and Low Interest Rates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(S1), pages 261-293, March.
    3. Carlos Parodi Trece, 2011. "Las crisis financieras: un marco conceptual," Chapters of Books,in: Carlos Parodi Trece (ed.), La primera crisis financiera internacional del siglo XXI, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 15-76 Fondo Editorial, Universidad del Pacífico.
    4. Matthias Lengnick & Hans-Werner Wohltmann, 2013. "Agent-based financial markets and New Keynesian macroeconomics: a synthesis," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 8(1), pages 1-32, April.
    5. Lengnick, Matthias & Wohltmann, Hans-Werner, 2016. "Optimal monetary policy in a new Keynesian model with animal spirits and financial markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 148-165.
    6. J. Rodrigo Fuentes S. & Marcelo Ochoa C., 2007. "Política Monetaria, Precios de Activos y Estabilidad Financiera: Una Revisión de la Literatura," Notas de Investigación Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 10(3), pages 115-127, December.
    7. Bask, Mikael, 2009. "Monetary Policy, Stock Price Misalignments and Macroeconomic Instability," Working Papers 540, Hanken School of Economics.
    8. Bradley Jones, 2015. "Asset Bubbles; Re-thinking Policy for the Age of Asset Management," IMF Working Papers 15/27, International Monetary Fund.


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