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Financial stress and its physical effects on individuals and communities

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Everywhere you look, the symptoms of the current recession are clear: homes lost to foreclosure, job losses across almost every sector of the economy, dwindling retirement portfolios, and frozen credit markets. But the recession has also led to a number of other symptoms that haven’t been getting enough attention: headaches, backaches, ulcers, increased blood pressure, depression and anxiety, just to name a few. Extended periods of stress can take their toll on physical, mental, and emotional health, compounding the difficulties that many low- and moderate-income communities face during troubled economic times. As we think about ways to strengthen health and community development finance at the institutional level, we need to remember the impact that financial instability can have on health outcomes at the individual level.

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  • Choi, Laura, 2009. "Financial stress and its physical effects on individuals and communities," Community Development Investment Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue 3, pages 120-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfcr:y:2009:p:120-122:n:v.5no.3
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    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/community/review/vol5_issue3/choi.pdf
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    1. Miriam Wasserman, 2000. "Mining data," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q3, pages 17-24.
    2. Joe Peek & Eric Rosengren, 1998. "The evolution of bank lending to small business," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 27-36.
    3. Gregory D. Squires & Sally O'Connor, 1999. "Access to capital: Milwaukee's small business lending gaps," Proceedings 773, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    4. Alicia Robb & Robert Fairlie, 2006. "Access to Financial Capital Among U.S. Businesses: The Case of African-American Firms," Working Papers 06-33, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. P. Köllinger & M. Minniti, 2006. "Not for Lack of Trying: American Entrepreneurship in Black and White," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 59-79, August.
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    1. Clayton, Maya & Liñares-Zegarra, José & Wilson, John O.S., 2015. "Does debt affect health? Cross country evidence on the debt-health nexus," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 51-58.

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