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Effects of state and local public policies on economic development: an overview


  • Katharine L. Bradbury
  • Yolanda K. Kodrzycki
  • Robert Tannenwald


The use of state and local public policy as an instrument of economic development is more controversial than ever. Profound technological and political changes have enhanced the geographic mobility of capital and extended firms' geographic range, intensifying competition among states and localities. At the same time, demand for state and local public services continues to rise, while impending reductions in federal aid compound the states' fiscal dilemma.> Caught between conflicting long-run fiscal pressures, state and local policymakers have sought advice on which policies are most cost-effective in stimulating their jurisdictions' economies. A symposium held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston on November 8, 1996 brought together experts from government, academia, business and finance, and research and other organizations, to examine and critique evidence on the effectiveness of state and local tax, spending, and regulatory policies as instruments of economic development.

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  • Katharine L. Bradbury & Yolanda K. Kodrzycki & Robert Tannenwald, 1997. "Effects of state and local public policies on economic development: an overview," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1997:i:mar:p:1-12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Peter Fortune, 1991. "The municipal bond market, Part I: politics, taxes, and yields," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Sep, pages 13-36.
    2. Fuhrer, Jeffrey C & Moore, George R, 1995. "Monetary Policy Trade-offs and the Correlation between Nominal Interest Rates and Real Output," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 219-239, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Carlos Suárez Serrato & Owen Zidar, 2016. "Who Benefits from State Corporate Tax Cuts? A Local Labor Markets Approach with Heterogeneous Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(9), pages 2582-2624, September.
    2. Catherine Co & John List, 2004. "Is foreign direct investment attracted to 'knowledge creators'?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(11), pages 1143-1149.
    3. Riefler, Roger F., 2005. "A New Geography for Information Technology Activity?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 35(2).
    4. Melanie Rapino & Benjamin Spaulding & Dean M. Hanink, 2006. "Have Per Capita Earnings and Income Converged across New England?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 620-637.
    5. Chirinko, Robert S. & Wilson, Daniel J., 2008. "State investment tax incentives: A zero-sum game?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(12), pages 2362-2384, December.
    6. Luger, Michael I. & Bae, Suho, 2006. "Speaking Falsehoods to Power: States' Misguided Use of 'Cost-of-Doing-Business' Studies in Economic Development Policy," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 15-43.
    7. Gramzow, Andreas, 2009. "Rural development as provision of local public goods: Theory and evidence from Poland," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 51, number 92313.
    8. Lorenz Blume, 2006. "Local economic policies as determinants of the local business climate: Empirical results from a cross-section analysis among East German municipalities," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 321-333.

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    Economic development ; State finance;


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