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Food Standards, Trade and Development

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  • Miet Martens
  • Jo Swinnen

Abstract

This paper discusses the impact of increasing standards in food production and trade on the export opportunities of low-income countries and on development in these countries. The increase in food standards is often seen as a threat to poor countries, diminishing their export opportunities and leading to an unequal distribution of the gains from trade, resulting in marginalization of poor farmers. However, many of the arguments are subject to debate and also empirical studies have come to diverse conclusions about the effects of increasing food standards on development. In this paper we give an overview of these arguments and the empirical evidence.

Suggested Citation

  • Miet Martens & Jo Swinnen, 2009. "Food Standards, Trade and Development," Review of Business and Economic Literature, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Review of Business and Economic Literature, vol. 0(3), pages 313-326.
  • Handle: RePEc:ete:revbec:20090306
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maros Ivanic & Will Martin, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 405-416, November.
    2. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2002. "Reforming agricultural markets in Africa," Food policy statements 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Nin Pratt, Alejandro & Yu, Bingxin, 2008. "An updated look at the recovery of agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 787, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Tom Slayton, 2009. "Rice Crisis Forensics: How Asian Governments Carelessly Set the World Rice Market on Fire," Working Papers 163, Center for Global Development.
    5. David Dawe, 2008. "Can Indonesia Trust The World Rice Market?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 115-132.
    6. Lopez, Ramon & Galinato, Gregmar I., 2007. "Should governments stop subsidies to private goods? Evidence from rural Latin America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 1071-1094, June.
    7. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2008. "The Effect of Monetary Policy on Real Commodity Prices," NBER Chapters,in: Asset Prices and Monetary Policy, pages 291-333 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2008. "The Impact of Fertilizer Subsidies on National Fertilizer Use: An Example from Malawi," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6464, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
    10. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
    11. Nora Lustig, 2008. "Thought for Food: The Challenges of Coping with Soaring Food Prices," Working Papers 155, Center for Global Development.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maertens, Miet & Swinnen, Johan, 2015. "Agricultural trade and development: A value chain perspective," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2015-04, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    2. Pierluigi Montalbano & Rebecca Pietrelli & Luca Salvatici, 2017. "Market chain participation and food security: the case of the Ugandan maize farmers," Working Papers 2/17, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    3. Fiankor, Dela-Dem Doe & Ehrich, Malte & Brümmer, Bernhard, 2016. "EU-African Regional Trade Agreements as a Development Tool to Reduce EU Border Rejections," Discussion Papers 244352, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    4. Hendrik W. Kruse & Inma Martínez-Zarzoso & Leila Baghdadi, 2017. "Standards and Market Power: Evidence from Tunisia," Working Papers 1131, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 2017.
    5. Johan Swinnen, 2014. "Global Agricultural Value Chains, Standards, and Development," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/30, European University Institute.
    6. repec:oup:erevae:v:44:y:2017:i:4:p:592-633. is not listed on IDEAS
    7. J. Wouters & A. Marx & N. Hachez, 2012. "Public and Private Food Safety Standards and International Trade Law. How to Build a Balanced Relationship," Chapters,in: Private Standards and Global Governance, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food standards; international trade; vertical coordination; food supply chains; developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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