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Human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship


  • Ángeles Montoro-Sánchez
  • Domingo Ribeiro Soriano


Purpose - The aim of this paper is to introduce the special issue on “Human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship”. Design/methodology/approach - The paper discuses the articles in the special issue, which investigate the relationships between human resource management and entrepreneurship from different points of view, approaches and employing different empirical contexts. Findings - The papers highlight different human resource management factors of entrepreneurial behaviour and their influence on corporate entrepreneurship. Results from different empirical contexts as small and medium-size firms, case studies, joint ventures, in the USA, China, and Spain, among others, make important contributions to the previous literature. Originality/value - The paper discusses the intersection and association between human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship. Human resources play an essential role in so far as they can encourage or hinder corporate entrepreneurship.

Suggested Citation

  • Ángeles Montoro-Sánchez & Domingo Ribeiro Soriano, 2011. "Human resource management and corporate entrepreneurship," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(1), pages 6-13, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:32:y:2011:i:1:p:6-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Roy Thurik, 2003. "Entrepreneurship and Unemployment in the UK," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 50(3), pages 264-290, August.
    14. Fabian Lange, 2007. "The Speed of Employer Learning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 1-35.
    15. Thomas, Jonathan M, 1996. "An Empirical Model of Sectoral Movements by Unemployed Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(1), pages 126-153, January.
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    18. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
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