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The case of transition economies: what institutions matter for growth?

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  • Azim Raimbaev

Abstract

There is a consensus among scholars that institutions (i.e. norms and regulations) are country specific. The article aims to contribute to the debate by examining what types of institutions have been most important for growth in transition countries. It employs a new set of institutional variables of the World Bank against the commonly used transition index of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. It appears that among the institutional variables government effectiveness has the most significant impact on growth in former planned economies. At the same time, classical growth factors seem to be more important for growth than institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Azim Raimbaev, 2011. "The case of transition economies: what institutions matter for growth?," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 54(2), pages 1-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eei:journl:v:54:y:2011:i:2:p:1-33
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2003. "Economic reform, democracy and growth during post-communist transition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 583-604, September.
    2. Karsten Staehr, 2005. "Reforms and Economic Growth in Transition Economies: Complementarity, Sequencing and Speed," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 2(2), pages 177-202, December.
    3. Jorge Braga De Macedo & Joaquim Oliveira Martins, 2008. "Growth, reform indicators and policy complementarities," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(2), pages 141-164, April.
    4. Falcetti, Elisabetta & Lysenko, Tatiana & Sanfey, Peter, 2006. "Reforms and growth in transition: Re-examining the evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 421-445, September.
    5. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7960 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura & Inyong Shin, 2013. "Decomposition of Ethnic Heterogeneity on Growth," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 55(1), pages 59-75, March.
    2. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2016. "Decline and Growth in Transition Economies: A Meta-Analysis," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-9, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Ciaian, Pavel & Pokrivčák, Ján & Kancs, D'Artis, 2012. "The Rise and Fall of Enforcement Institutions: An Example of Religion and Secularism," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(02), pages 233-251, May.
    4. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2013. "Structural Reforms and Growth in Transition: A Meta-Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1057, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2014. "Structural reforms and growth in transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(1), pages 13-42, January.
    6. Doris Hanzl-Weiss & Mario Holzner & Roman Stöllinger, 2013. "Monthly Report No. 4/2013," wiiw Monthly Reports 2013-04, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. Antonio Carvalho & Matthew Cable & Rabindra Nepal & Tooraj Jamasb, 2013. "Market-Oriented Structural Reforms and Human Development: Evidence from Transition Economies," Discussion Papers Series 493, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Institutions; governance; transition economies; growth.;

    JEL classification:

    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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