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National goals and tools to fulfil them: A study of opportunities and pitfalls in Norwegian metagovernance of urban mobility

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  • Tønnesen, Anders
  • Krogstad, Julie Runde
  • Christiansen, Petter
  • Isaksson, Karolina

Abstract

•Some of the greatest potential of the UGAs is found in their regional ambition.•Ability differences between municipalities help explaining implementation barriers.•UGA can be an intervening stage preventing meta-policy from being toothless locally.•It is important that UGAs create governance arenas with internal accountability.

Suggested Citation

  • Tønnesen, Anders & Krogstad, Julie Runde & Christiansen, Petter & Isaksson, Karolina, 2019. "National goals and tools to fulfil them: A study of opportunities and pitfalls in Norwegian metagovernance of urban mobility," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 35-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:81:y:2019:i:c:p:35-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2019.05.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Hirschhorn, Fabio & van de Velde, Didier & Veeneman, Wijnand & ten Heuvelhof, Ernst, 2020. "The governance of attractive public transport: Informal institutions, institutional entrepreneurs, and problem-solving know-how in Oslo and Amsterdam," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C).
    3. Christiansen, Petter, 2020. "The effects of transportation priority congruence for political legitimacy," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 61-76.
    4. Alys Solly & Erblin Berisha & Giancarlo Cotella, 2021. "Towards Sustainable Urbanization. Learning from What’s Out There," Land, MDPI, vol. 10(4), pages 1-23, April.

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