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Demographic determinants of daily travel demand

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  • Metz, David

Abstract

Per capita demand for daily travel in a number of developed countries has ceased to grow, which means that demographic change, both growth and ageing of the population, will be the main determinant of future travel demand and traffic levels. The effect of demographic change on travel demand arises through changes in land use, which in turn are affected by planning policy. In particular, how the additional population will be housed, whether on greenfield or brownfield sites, will be important for decisions on investment in the transport system. Increased population density within existing urban areas facilitates access and is best served by public transport. The declining share of car-based journeys in London illustrates the scope for containing traffic congestion and carbon emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Metz, David, 2012. "Demographic determinants of daily travel demand," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 20-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:21:y:2012:i:c:p:20-25
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2012.01.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Banister, David & Bowling, Ann, 2004. "Quality of life for the elderly: the transport dimension," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 105-115, April.
    2. David Metz, 2003. "Transport policy for an ageing population," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 375-386, July.
    3. David Metz, 2011. "A Delicate Balance: Mobility and Access Needs, Expectations and Costs," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/7, OECD Publishing.
    4. Metz, D. H., 2000. "Mobility of older people and their quality of life," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 149-152, April.
    5. S. Cairns & L. Sloman & C. Newson & J. Anable & A. Kirkbride & P. Goodwin, 2008. "Smarter Choices: Assessing the Potential to Achieve Traffic Reduction Using ‘Soft Measures’," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(5), pages 593-618, January.
    6. Graham-Rowe, Ella & Skippon, Stephen & Gardner, Benjamin & Abraham, Charles, 2011. "Can we reduce car use and, if so, how? A review of available evidence," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 401-418, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rode, Philipp & Floater, Graham & Thomopoulos, Nikolas & Docherty, James & Schwinger, Peter & Mahendra, Anjali & Fang, Wanli, 2014. "Accessibility in cities: transport and urban form," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60477, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. repec:eee:transa:v:101:y:2017:i:c:p:238-251 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jean-Paul Hubert & Jean-Loup Madre & Pierre Pistre, 2016. "L’utilisation de l’automobile par les ménages dans les territoires peu denses : analyse croisée par les enquêtes sur la mobilité et le Recensement de la population," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 483(1), pages 179-203.
    4. repec:eee:transa:v:101:y:2017:i:c:p:218-227 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Páez, Antonio & Moniruzzaman, Md. & Bourbonnais, Pierre-Leo & Morency, Catherine, 2013. "Developing a web-based accessibility calculator prototype for the Greater Montreal Area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 103-115.

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