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Income inequality and mortality in U.S. cities: Weighing the evidence. A response to Ash

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  • Deaton, Angus
  • Lubotsky, Darren

Abstract

Deaton and Lubotsky (2003) found that the robust positive relationship across American cities between mortality and income inequality became small, insignificant, and/or non-robust once they controlled for the fraction of each city's population that is black. Ash and Robinson (Ash, M., & Robinson D. Inequality, race, and mortality in US cities: a political and econometric review. Social Science and Medicine, 2009) consider alternative weighting schemes and show that in one of our specifications, in one data period, and with one of their alternative weighting schemes, income inequality is estimated to be a risk factor. All of our other specifications, as well as their own preferred specification, replicate our original result, which is supported by the weight of the evidence. Conditional on fraction black, there is no evidence for an effect of income inequality on mortality.

Suggested Citation

  • Deaton, Angus & Lubotsky, Darren, 2009. "Income inequality and mortality in U.S. cities: Weighing the evidence. A response to Ash," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 1914-1917, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:68:y:2009:i:11:p:1914-1917
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    Cited by:

    1. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy Van Doorslaer & Tom Van Ourti, 2013. "Health and Inequality," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-170/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Choi, HwaJung & Burgard, Sarah & Elo, Irma T. & Heisler, Michele, 2015. "Are older adults living in more equal counties healthier than older adults living in more unequal counties? A propensity score matching approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 82-90.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality Race Health inequality Mortality Geography USA;

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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