IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/marpol/v46y2014icp91-100.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Procedural and distributive justice in a community-based managed Marine Protected Area in Zanzibar, Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Gustavsson, Madeleine
  • Lindström, Lars
  • Jiddawi, Narriman S.
  • de la Torre-Castro, Maricela

Abstract

Local participation in governance and management is assumed to lead to something good. But it is rarely explicitly stated who are participating and in what. The study investigates this in the context of a Marine Protected Area (MPA) in Zanzibar, Tanzania, and in particular the Memba Island – Chwaka Bay Marine Conservation Area (MIMCA). This is done by applying Pretty's typology of participation in addressing procedural justice, which is according to Paavola linked to distributive justice, i.e. the just distribution of costs and benefits. How does participation in MIMCA facilitate procedural and distributive justice? To answer this question a number of fishermen, women seaweed farmers, local leaders, and representatives of the private sector were interviewed (n=136) in five villages. Interviews were also made with government officials at relevant departments. The results show that Village Fishermen Committees were participating in the implementation of MIMCA but not in its planning phase. Participation was mainly in the form of manipulative and passive participation. Other local actors did not participate at all. Instead, the government assumed that justice was achieved by distributing equipment, alternative income generating projects, and relying on tourism for local development. However, the distributed equipment and tourism development have created conflict and injustice within and between villages, because of the insufficient resources which did not target those in need. Tourism created problems such as inequality between livelihoods, environmental destruction and local power asymmetries between hotel management and local people. The MIMCA top-down intervention has not increased participation or justice, nor has it achieved sustainable resource use and conflict resolution. It is suggested that interactive participation by all local actors is needed to create just trade-offs. Justice needs to be explicitly addressed for integrated conservation and development projects to achieve sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavsson, Madeleine & Lindström, Lars & Jiddawi, Narriman S. & de la Torre-Castro, Maricela, 2014. "Procedural and distributive justice in a community-based managed Marine Protected Area in Zanzibar, Tanzania," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 91-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:marpol:v:46:y:2014:i:c:p:91-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2014.01.005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14000074
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chaudhary, Sunita & McGregor, Andrew & Houston, Donna & Chettri, Nakul, 2018. "Environmental justice and ecosystem services: A disaggregated analysis of community access to forest benefits in Nepal," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 29(PA), pages 99-115.
    2. Katikiro, Robert E. & Macusi, Edison D. & Ashoka Deepananda, K.H.M., 2015. "Challenges facing local communities in Tanzania in realising locally-managed marine areas," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 220-229.
    3. Brendan Coolsaet & Neil Dawson & Florian Rabitz & Simone Lovera, 0. "Access and allocation in global biodiversity governance: a review," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-17.
    4. Chaudhary, Sunita & McGregor, Andrew & Houston, Donna & Chettri, Nakul, 2018. "Reprint of: Environmental justice and ecosystem services: A disaggregated analysis of community access to forest benefits in Nepal," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 29(PB), pages 316-332.
    5. Jennifer A. Martin & Summer Gray & Eréndira Aceves-Bueno & Peter Alagona & Tammy L. Elwell & Angela Garcia & Zach Horton & David Lopez-Carr & Jessica Marter-Kenyon & Karly Marie Miller & Christopher S, 2019. "What is marine justice?," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 9(2), pages 234-243, June.
    6. Brendan Coolsaet & Neil Dawson & Florian Rabitz & Simone Lovera, 2020. "Access and allocation in global biodiversity governance: a review," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 359-375, June.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:marpol:v:46:y:2014:i:c:p:91-100. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.