IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

The formal–informal patient payment mix in European countries. Governance, economics, culture or all of these?

Listed author(s):
  • Tambor, Marzena
  • Pavlova, Milena
  • Golinowska, Stanisława
  • Sowada, Christoph
  • Groot, Wim

Cost-sharing for health care is high on the policy agenda in many European countries that struggle with deficits in their public budget. However, such policy often meets with public opposition, which might delay or even prevent its implementation. Increased reliance on patient payments may also have adverse equity effects, especially in countries where informal patient payments are widespread. The factors which might influence the presence of both, formal and informal payments can be found in economic, governance and cultural differences between countries.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851013002467
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 284-295

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:284-295
DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.09.011
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Ensor, Tim, 2004. "Informal payments for health care in transition economies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 237-246, January.
  2. Witold J. Henisz, 2002. "The institutional environment for infrastructure investment," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 355-389.
  3. Balabanova, Dina & McKee, Martin, 2002. "Understanding informal payments for health care: the example of Bulgaria," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 243-273, December.
  4. Andrea Leiter & Engelbert Theurl, 2012. "The convergence of health care financing structures: empirical evidence from OECD-countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(1), pages 7-18, February.
  5. Atanasova, Elka & Pavlova, Milena & Velickovski, Robert & Nikov, Bogomil & Moutafova, Emanuela & Groot, Wim, 2011. "What have 10 years of health insurance reforms brought about in Bulgaria? Re-appraising the Health Insurance Act of 1998," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 263-269.
  6. Baji, Petra & Pavlova, Milena & Gulácsi, LászlÓ & Groot, Wim, 2011. "User fees for public health care services in Hungary: Expectations, experience, and acceptability from the perspectives of different stakeholders," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 255-262.
  7. Lostao, Lourdes & Regidor, Enrique & Geyer, Siegfried & Aïach, Pierre, 2007. "Patient cost sharing and social inequalities in access to health care in three western European countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 367-376, July.
  8. Belli, Paolo & Gotsadze, George & Shahriari, Helen, 2004. "Out-of-pocket and informal payments in health sector: evidence from Georgia," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 109-123, October.
  9. Gené-Badia, Joan & Gallo, Pedro & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & García-Armesto, Sandra, 2012. "Spanish health care cuts: Penny wise and pound foolish?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 23-28.
  10. Ardeshir Sepehri & Robert Chernomas, 2001. "Are user charges efficiency- and equity-enhancing? A critical review of economic literature with particular reference to experience from developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 183-209.
  11. Gaal, Peter & McKee, Martin, 2005. "Fee-for-service or donation? Hungarian perspectives on informal payment for health care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(7), pages 1445-1457, April.
  12. Szende, Agota & Culyer, Anthony Johr, 2006. "The inequity of informal payments for health care: The case of Hungary," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 262-271, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:284-295. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

or ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.