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Use of a parent management training intervention with urban foster parents: A pilot study

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  • Leathers, Sonya J.
  • Spielfogel, Jill E.
  • McMeel, Lorri S.
  • Atkins, Marc S.

Abstract

The development of effective interventions for foster children with behavior problems is essential given the consequences of behavior problems for children's placement stability and permanency outcomes. This article presents findings from a pilot study of an intervention providing parent management training (PMT) and support to foster parents in groups and home visits. The intervention was an adaptation of the KEEP (Keeping Foster Parents Trained and Supported) group intervention, provided in a large urban child welfare agency serving predominantly African American foster parents. The study used an intent-to-treat design, with 25 foster parents of 31 children (ages 4-12) in specialized foster care assigned to either an intervention or treatment as usual control group. Longitudinal outcomes were analyzed using random effect regression models. Over time, children's behavior problems were significantly lower in the intervention group relative to the control group, and the effect of the intervention was partially mediated by parents' understanding of how to appropriately use the intervention parenting skills. These results provide support for the effectiveness of KEEP with urban foster children with significant behavior problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Leathers, Sonya J. & Spielfogel, Jill E. & McMeel, Lorri S. & Atkins, Marc S., 2011. "Use of a parent management training intervention with urban foster parents: A pilot study," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1270-1279, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:33:y:2011:i:7:p:1270-1279
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Harris, Marian S. & Courtney, Mark E., 2003. "The interaction of race, ethnicity, and family structure with respect to the timing of family reunification," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(5-6), pages 409-429.
    2. Puddy, Richard W. & Jackson, Yo, 2003. "The Development of Parenting Skills in Foster Parent Training," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 987-1013, December.
    3. Stone, Susan, 2007. "Child maltreatment, out-of-home placement and academic vulnerability: A fifteen-year review of evidence and future directions," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 139-161, February.
    4. Dorsey, Shannon & Farmer, Elizabeth M.Z. & Barth, Richard P. & Greene, Kaylin M. & Reid, John & Landsverk, John, 2008. "Current status and evidence base of training for foster and treatment foster parents," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 1403-1416, December.
    5. Leathers, Sonya J. & Atkins, Marc S. & Spielfogel, Jill E. & McMeel, Lorri S. & Wesley, Julia M. & Davis, Rafe, 2009. "Context-specific mental health services for children in foster care," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 1289-1297, December.
    6. James, Sigrid & Landsverk, John & Slymen, Donald J., 2004. "Placement movement in out-of-home care: patterns and predictors," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 185-206, February.
    7. Petra, Megan & Kohl, Patricia, 2010. "Pathways Triple P and the child welfare system: A promising fit," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 611-618, April.
    8. Fees, Bronwyn S. & Stockdale, Dahlia F. & Crase, Sedahlia Jasper & Riggins-caspers, Kristin & Yates, Amy Moeller & Lekies, Kristi S. & Gillis-Arnold, Renee, 1998. "Satisfaction with foster parenting: Assessment one year after training," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 347-363, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Greeno, Elizabeth J. & Uretsky, Mathew C. & Lee, Bethany R. & Moore, Jessica E. & Barth, Richard P. & Shaw, Terry V., 2016. "Replication of the KEEP foster and kinship parent training program for youth with externalizing behaviors," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 75-82.
    2. Festinger, Trudy & Baker, Amy J.L., 2013. "The quality of evaluations of foster parent training: An empirical review," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2147-2153.
    3. Spielfogel, Jill E. & Leathers, Sonya J. & Christian, Errick & McMeel, Lorri S., 2011. "Parent management training, relationships with agency staff, and child mental health: Urban foster parents' perspectives," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 2366-2374.
    4. Leathers, Sonya J. & Spielfogel, Jill E. & Gleeson, James P. & Rolock, Nancy, 2012. "Behavior problems, foster home integration, and evidence-based behavioral interventions: What predicts adoption of foster children?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 891-899.

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