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Analysis of factors involved in the social inclusion process of young people fostered in residential care institutions

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  • Sala Roca, Josefina
  • Jariot García, Mercè
  • Villalba Biarnés, Andreu
  • Rodríguez, Montserrat

Abstract

This study aims to analyse how the characteristics of Youth under custody in foster residences and the characteristics of foster residences affect the sociolaboral insertion after coming of age. This information is important for maximizing the possibilities of an autonomous, positive and satisfactory life after coming of age. The directors of 36 finalist residences that care for young people who will come of age in the same center were interviewed. Information about people who left the residences when they came of age over the past 2 to 5 years (n = 143) was gathered. Results show that after leaving the center, girls lived more with their partner, became pregnant at an early age, and did not work although they had received more job training than boys and did not seem to have more work instability. The young people who had been in more than one center had more problems with drugs, did not have a job, and have less acceptance of social rules, perseverance at work and emotional regulation than the other young people. The subgroups classified as "successful" scored better than other groups in autonomy; education, acceptance of the rules, perseverance at work, emotional regulation, ability to negotiate and be assertive. More "successful" young people came from centers in which the educators have less children.

Suggested Citation

  • Sala Roca, Josefina & Jariot García, Mercè & Villalba Biarnés, Andreu & Rodríguez, Montserrat, 2009. "Analysis of factors involved in the social inclusion process of young people fostered in residential care institutions," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 1251-1257, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:31:y:2009:i:12:p:1251-1257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marinkovic, Jelena A. & Backovic, Dusan, 2007. "Relationship between type of placement and competencies and problem behavior of adolescents in long-term foster care," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 216-225, February.
    2. McCoy, Henrika & McMillen, J. Curtis & Spitznagel, Edward L., 2008. "Older youth leaving the foster care system: Who, what, when, where, and why?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 735-745, July.
    3. Jones, Loring & Lansdverk, John, 2006. "Residential education: Examining a new approach for improving outcomes for foster youth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(10), pages 1152-1168, October.
    4. Legault, Louise & Anawati, Michelle & Flynn, Robert, 2006. "Factors favoring psychological resilience among fostered young people," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 1024-1038, September.
    5. Hawkins-Rodgers, Yolanda, 2007. "Adolescents adjusting to a group home environment: A residential care model of re-organizing attachment behavior and building resiliency," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1131-1141, September.
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    1. Roberts, Louise & Long, Sara Jayne & Young, Honor & Hewitt, Gillian & Murphy, Simon & Moore, Graham F., 2018. "Sexual health outcomes for young people in state care: Cross-sectional analysis of a national survey and views of social care professionals in Wales," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 281-288.
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    4. Zárate-Alva, Nair Elizabeth & Sala-Roca, Josefina, 2019. "Socio-emotional skills of girls and young mothers in foster care," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 50-56.

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