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Endogenous vs. Semi-endogenous Growth in a Two-R&D-Sector Model


  • Li, Chol-Won


This paper contributes to the endogenous versus semi-endogenous growth debate by establishing that semi-endogenous growth is more general than endogenous growth in a two-R&D-sector growth model. It is demonstrated that endogenous growth requires two "knife-edge" conditions of parameters. This finding (i) is in sharp contrast to recent two-R&D-sector models that show that long-run growth is endogenous, and (ii) resurrects the policy conclusion of semi-endogenous growth that government policy is not effective in raising the underlying growth rate of an economy. The driving force of these results is knowledge spillovers between two R&D activities, which are largely neglected in existing studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Chol-Won, 2000. "Endogenous vs. Semi-endogenous Growth in a Two-R&D-Sector Model," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 109-122, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:110:y:2000:i:462:p:c109-22

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Charles I., 2005. "Growth and Ideas," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 1063-1111 Elsevier.
    2. Stephen Drinkwater & Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2007. "The Immigration Surplus Revisited In A General Equilibrium Model With Endogenous Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 569-601.
    3. Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Growth: With or Without Scale Effects?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 139-144, May.
    4. Nicholas Bloom & Charles I. Jones & John Van Reenen & Michael Webb, 2017. "Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?," NBER Working Papers 23782, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Can Askan Mavi, 2017. "Creative Destruction vs Destructive Destruction ? : A Schumpeterian Approach for Adaptation and Mitigation," Working Papers halshs-01455297, HAL.
    6. Dean Scrimgeour, 2015. "Dynamic Scoring in a Romer-Style Economy," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 697-723, January.
    7. Angus C. Chu & Ching-Chong Lai, 2009. "On the Growth and Welfare Effects of Defense R&D," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 09-A008, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, revised Dec 2009.
    8. Holger Strulik, 2005. "The Role of Human Capital and Population Growth in R&D-based Models of Economic Growth," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 129-145, February.
    9. Creina Day, 2006. "Population and Endogenous Growth," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-475, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    10. Christian Groth, 2004. "Innovation and growth: What have we learnt from the robustness debate?," Discussion Papers 04-29, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics, revised Nov 2004.

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