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French Stock exchanges and regulation during World War II

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  • Oosterlinck, Kim

Abstract

Based on archives of the French brokers, the French finance ministry and the occupying forces, this article analyses the motivations of the legal changes imposed on the French exchanges during the war. Most of the measures taken by the Vichy government were meant to stimulate the demand for French state bonds. Three main tools were used to render stocks as unattractive as possible: forced registration, imposition of a maximum threshold for stock prices and taxation. The article suggests that forced registration and the cap on maximum prices were the most efficient tools.

Suggested Citation

  • Oosterlinck, Kim, 2010. "French Stock exchanges and regulation during World War II," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(02), pages 211-237, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:fihrev:v:17:y:2010:i:02:p:211-237_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Mitchener, Kris James & Oosterlinck, Kim & Weidenmier, Marc D. & Haber, Stephen, 2015. "Victory or repudiation? Predicting winners in civil wars using international financial markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 310-319.
    2. Urquhart, Andrew & Hudson, Robert, 2016. "Investor sentiment and local bias in extreme circumstances: The case of the Blitz," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 340-350.
    3. Gallais-Hamonno, Georges & Hoang, Thi-Hong-Van & Oosterlinck, Kim, 2015. "Informational efficiency of the clandestine and official gold markets in Paris," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 28-30.
    4. Geraldine David & Kim Oosterlinck, 2011. "War, Inflation, Monetary Reforms and the Art Market .The Belgian Art market (1944 – 1951)," Working Papers CEB 11-055, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Geraldine David & Kim Oosterlinck, 2012. "War, Inflation, Monetary Reform and the Art Market," Working Papers 0012, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    6. Georges Gallais-Hamonno & Thi-hong-van Hoang & Kim Oosterlinck, 2016. "Price Formation on Clandestine Markets: The Case of the Paris Gold Market during WWII," Working Papers CEB 16-048, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. Haber, Stephen H & Mitchener, Kris & Oosterlinck, Kim & Weidenmier, Marc, 2014. "Predicting Winners in Civil Wars," CEPR Discussion Papers 10109, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Kim Oosterlinck, 2013. "Art as a Wartime Investment: Conspicuous Consumption and Discretion," Working Papers CEB 13-039, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. Suzuki, Shiba, 2012. "Stock market booms in economies damaged during World War II," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 175-183.

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