IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cje/issued/v44y2011i1p201-226.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Trade-related intellectual property rights: industry variation and technology diffusion

Author

Listed:
  • Olena Ivus

Abstract

This paper assesses how a strengthening of intellectual property rights (IPRs) affects international technology diffusion by altering the volume of high-tech exports into developing countries. A simple North-South general equilibrium model in which industries differ in their imitation rates is developed. Stronger IPRs encourage Northern firms in a wider range of industries to start exporting. Exports in industries with the highest risk of imitation rise, while exports in other industries may fall. More technology diffuses to the South because new high-tech products are introduced in the Southern market. This works against the reduction in technology diffusion caused by limited imitation.

Suggested Citation

  • Olena Ivus, 2011. "Trade-related intellectual property rights: industry variation and technology diffusion," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(1), pages 201-226, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:44:y:2011:i:1:p:201-226
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://economics.ca/cgi/xms?jab=v44n1/CJEv44n1p0201.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: Available to subscribers only. Alternative access through JSTOR and Ingenta.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. ICHIDA Toshihiro, 2013. "Imitation versus Innovation Costs: Patent policies under common patent length," Discussion papers 13054, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Iwaisako, Tatsuro & Tanaka, Hitoshi, 2017. "Product cycles and growth cycles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 22-40.
    3. Alireza Naghavi & Julia Spies & Farid Toubal, 2011. "International Sourcing, Product Complexity and Intellectual Property Rights," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 067, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    4. Kamal Saggi, 2013. "Market Power in the Global Economy: The Exhaustion and Protection of Intellectual Property," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(567), pages 131-161, March.
    5. repec:eee:inecon:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:235-245 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kamal Saggi, 2016. "Trade, Intellectual Property Rights, and the World Trade Organization," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 16-00014, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. Alireza Naghavi & Julia Spies & Farid Toubal, 2015. "Intellectual property rights, product complexity and the organization of multinational firms," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 48(3), pages 881-902, August.
    8. Mónica L. Azevedo & Óscar Afonso & Sandra T. Silva, 2013. "Endogenous growth and intellectual property rights: a North-South modelling proposal," FEP Working Papers 492, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    9. Olena Ivus & Walter Park & Kamal Saggi, 2016. "Intellectual Property Protection And The Industrial Composition Of Multinational Activity," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1068-1085, April.
    10. Metaxas, Theodore & Kechagia, Polyxeni, 2012. "F.D.I. through the imitation procedure The case of China: A Note," MPRA Paper 40886, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Olena Ivus & Walter Park & Kamal Saggi, 2015. "Patent Protection and the Industrial Composition of Multinational Activity: Evidence from U.S. Multinational Firms," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 15-00014, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    12. Jenny X. Lin & William Lincoln, 2017. "Pirate’s Treasure," Working Papers 17-51, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    13. Azevedo, Mónica L. & Afonso, Óscar & Silva, Sandra T., 2014. "Endogenous growth and intellectual property rights: A north–south modeling proposal," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 112-120.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:44:y:2011:i:1:p:201-226. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ceaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.