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Turning the Tide: Bringing Economics Teaching into the Twenty First Century

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  • Paul Ormerod

    () (Volterra Consulting)

Abstract

Economics as a discipline has considerable strengths. But the number of economics students has fallen substantially over a number of years. How can the tide be turned and the product made more attractive? Economics textbooks have become too dogmatic, as if many problems have been solved and students simply need to absorb a settled body of knowledge. Theoretical models taught in courses need empirical grounding if they are to be persuasive. Students need to know about the key episodes in 20th century economic history, and about the importance of institutions. Computer technology can be used to good effect with agent-based models.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Ormerod, 2003. "Turning the Tide: Bringing Economics Teaching into the Twenty First Century," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 1(1), pages 71-79.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:1:y:2003:i:1:p:71-79
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don Webber, 2014. "Why do Students Study Economics?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 119-147, March.
      • Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don J. Webber, 2013. "Why do students study economics?," Working Papers 20131303, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Green, Tom L., 2013. "Teaching (un)sustainability? University sustainability commitments and student experiences of introductory economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 135-142.
    3. Don J. Webber & Andrew Mearman, 2009. "Students’ perceptions of economics:Identifying demand for further study," Working Papers 0914, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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