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Trade, Technology and Human Capital: Stylised Facts and Quantitative Evidence

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  • Gouranga Gopal Das

Abstract

Stylised evidence on trade, total factor productivity (TFP) and skill intensity of the labour force is presented. Features emerging as salient are: growing trade in technology-intensive products from the industrialised nations to the relatively laggard nations leads to embodied technology diffusion; the technology-intensive sectors have larger shares of skilled workers; countries experiencing TFP growth usually have higher levels of educational attainment; also, the skilled labour payment share for a sector is positively associated with that sector's regional trade share. These facts together help explain why endowment of more skilled labour facilitates absorption of technology ferried via trade. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002.

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  • Gouranga Gopal Das, 2002. "Trade, Technology and Human Capital: Stylised Facts and Quantitative Evidence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(2), pages 257-281, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:25:y:2002:i:2:p:257-281
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    Cited by:

    1. Nadia Belhaj Hassine & Veronique Robichaud & Bernard Decaluwé, 2010. "Agricultural Trade Liberalization, Productivity Gain and Poverty Alleviation: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers 519, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 Jan 2010.
    2. Gouranga Das, 2009. "A hybrid production structure in trade: theory and implications," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 56(4), pages 359-375, December.
    3. Das, Gouranga Gopal, 2015. "Why some countries are slow in acquiring new technologies? A model of trade-led diffusion and absorption," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 65-91.
    4. Stefan Lachenmaier & Ludger Wößmann, 2004. "Does Innovation Cause Exports? Evidence from Exogenous Innovation Impulses and Obstacles," CESifo Working Paper Series 1178, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Gouranga Gopal Das, 2002. "Trade-Induced Technology Spillover And Adoption: A Quantitative General Equilibrium Application," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 21-44, December.
    6. Das, Gouranga, 2010. "Globalization, socio-institutional factors and North–South knowledge diffusion: Role of India and China as Southern growth progenitors," MPRA Paper 37252, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Aug 2011.
    7. Nadia Belhaj Hassine & Veronique Robichaud & Bernard Decaluwé, 2010. "Does Agricultural Trade Liberalization Help The Poor in Tunisia? A Micro-Macro View in A Dynamic General Equilibrium Context," Working Papers 556, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Jan 2010.

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