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The Degree and Pattern of Income Immobility in Sweden

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  • Gustafsson, Bjorn

Abstract

This paper studies immobility in the distribution of income using Swedish data. Tax data shows immobility in personal income to be a decreasing function of the length of the period over which it is studied and an increasing function of initial age. The results show immobility to be larger among males than among females. Based on a household income survey, it is found that, when the time period expands from one to two years, the Gini coefficient of equivalent income per person decreases by five percent. A sample of males indicates that income immobility between generations in Sweden is low. Copyright 1994 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustafsson, Bjorn, 1994. "The Degree and Pattern of Income Immobility in Sweden," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(1), pages 67-86, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:40:y:1994:i:1:p:67-86
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    Cited by:

    1. Canto, Olga, 2000. "Income Mobility in Spain: How Much Is There?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(1), pages 85-102, March.
    2. Miles Corak & Andrew Heisz, 1999. "The Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility of Canadian Men: Evidence from Longitudinal Income Tax Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 504-533.
    3. Jo Blanden, 2009. "How Much Can We Learn from International Comparisons of Intergenerational Mobility?," CEE Discussion Papers 0111, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    4. Rolf Aaberge & Magne Mogstad, 2009. "On the Measurement of Long-Term Income Inequality and Income Mobility," ICER Working Papers 09-2009, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    5. Aaberge, Rolf, et al, 2002. "Income Inequality and Income Mobility in the Scandinavian Countries Compared to the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(4), pages 443-469, December.
    6. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2005. "Intergenerational Mobility: Trends Across the Earnings Distribution," Working Papers in Economics 04/05, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    7. driouchi, ahmed & Gamar, Alae, 2015. "Is there a Gatsby Curve for Educational Attainment in Arab Countries?," MPRA Paper 63869, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 Apr 2015.
    8. Dang, Thang, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility of earnings and income among sons and daughters in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Thomas Raferzeder & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2007. "Who is on the rise in Austria: Wage mobility and mobility risk," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(1), pages 39-51, April.
    10. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2002. "Assessing Changes in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Working Papers in Economics 26/02, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    11. Blanden, Jo, 2013. "Cross-national rankings of intergenerational mobility: a comparison of approaches from economics and sociology," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59310, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Miles Corak & Andrew Heisz, 1998. "The Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility of Canadian," Labor and Demography 9808001, EconWPA.
    13. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    14. Maribel Jiménez, 2011. "Un Análisis Empírico de las No Linealidades en la Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso. El caso de la Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0114, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    15. Birgitta Jansson, 2014. "Intragenerational Income Mobility in Gothenburg, Sweden, 1925–94: Before, during, and after the Rise of the Welfare State," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 54(1), pages 14-36, March.
    16. Corak, Miles, 2006. "Do Poor Children Become Poor Adults? Lessons from a Cross Country Comparison of Generational Earnings Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 1993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Peter Krause & Bruce Headey, 1995. "Rich and Poor: Stability or Change?: West German Income Mobility 1984-93," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 126, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    18. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i:2:p:219-233 is not listed on IDEAS

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