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The Sectoral Productivity Performance of Japan and the U.S., 1885-1990

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  • Pilat, Dirk

Abstract

This paper provides a disaggregated productivity comparison between Japan and the United States for the period 1885-1990. It combines two detailed productivity comparisons for 1939 and 1975 with time series to provide a long-term sectoral perspective. There is much diversity in the Japanese experience. The agricultural sector has shown relative stagnation since 1885. The service sector showed considerable growth before the Second World War and reached high productivity levels in the postwar period. There is great diversity in productivity levels within services. Japan's manufacturing sector has shown the fastest catch-up and its productivity level is currently close to that of the United States. Copyright 1993 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Pilat, Dirk, 1993. "The Sectoral Productivity Performance of Japan and the U.S., 1885-1990," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 39(4), pages 357-375, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:39:y:1993:i:4:p:357-75
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    6. Phipps, Shelley & Garner, Thesia I, 1994. "Are Equivalence Scales the Same for the United States and Canada?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(1), pages 1-17, March.
    7. Buhmann, Brigitte, et al, 1988. "Equivalence Scales, Well-Being, Inequality, and Poverty: Sensitivity Estimates across Ten Countries Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, pages 115-142.
    8. McClements, L. D., 1977. "Equivalence scales for children," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 191-210.
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    Cited by:

    1. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 1998. "Comparing British and American Economic and Industrial Performance 1860-1993: A Time Series Perspective," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 171-195, April.
    2. Broadberry, Stephen & Gupta, Bishnupriya, 2010. "The historical roots of India's service-led development: A sectoral analysis of Anglo-Indian productivity differences, 1870-2000," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 264-278, July.

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