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The Impact Of Higher Education Institution–Firm Knowledge Links On Establishment-Level Productivity In British Regions

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  • RICHARD HARRIS
  • QIAN CHER LI
  • JOHN MOFFAT

Abstract

This paper estimates whether sourcing knowledge from and/or cooperating on innovation with higher education institutions impacts on establishment-level TFP and whether this impact differs across domestically-owned and foreign-owned establishments and across the regions of Great Britain. Using propensity score matching, the results show overall a positive and statistically significant impact although there are differences in the strength of this impact across production and non-production industries, across domestically-owned and foreign-owned firms, and across regions. These results highlight the importance of absorptive capacity in determining the extent to which establishments can benefit from linkages with higher education institutions.
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Suggested Citation

  • Richard Harris & Qian Cher Li & John Moffat, 2013. "The Impact Of Higher Education Institution–Firm Knowledge Links On Establishment-Level Productivity In British Regions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 81(2), pages 143-162, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:81:y:2013:i:2:p:143-162
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.2013.81.issue-2
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    Cited by:

    1. Kristinn Hermannsson & Katerina Lisenkova & Patrizio Lecca & Peter McGregor & Kim Swales, 2010. "The Importance of Graduates for the Scottish Economy: A "Micro-to-Macro" Approach," Working Papers 1026, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    2. Kristinn Hermannsson & Katerina Lisenkova & Peter McGregor & Kim Swales, 2010. "The Expenditure Impacts of Individual Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and their Students on the Scottish Economy under Devolution: Homogeneity or Heterogeneity?," Working Papers 1016, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Kristinn Hermannsson & Katerina Lisenkova & Peter McGregor & Kim Swales, 2010. "The Expenditure Impacts of Individual Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and their Students on the Welsh Economy: Homogeneity or Heterogeneity?," Working Papers 1027, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    4. Carlos Vivas & Andrés Barge-Gil, 2015. "Impact On Firms Of The Use Of Knowledge External Sources: A Systematic Review Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 943-964, December.
    5. Hermannsson, Kristinn & Lisenkova, Katerina & McGregor, Peter G & Swales, J Kim, 2010. "The Expenditure Impacts of London-based Individual Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and their Students on the Economy of England: Homogeneity or Heterogeneity?," SIRE Discussion Papers 2010-106, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    6. Hermannsson, Kristinn & Lisenkova, Katerina & McGregor, Peter G., 2011. "The Expenditure Impacts of Individual Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and their Students on the Northern Irish Economy: Homogeneity or Heterogeneity?," SIRE Discussion Papers 2011-07, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. Andrew Johnston & Robert Huggins, 2017. "University-industry links and the determinants of their spatial scope: A study of the knowledge intensive business services sector," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(2), pages 247-260, June.
    8. Haskel, J & Haskel, J & Hughes, A & Bascavusoglu-Moreau, E, 2014. "The economic significance of the UK science base: a report for the Campaign for Science and Engineering," Working Papers 13751, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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