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Labour Market in Motion: Analysing Regional Flows in a Multi-accounting System


  • Anette Haas
  • Thomas Rothe


The analysis of labour market dynamics is essential for labour market research and policy advice. We develop a flexible flow approach system - a multi-accounting system (MAS) - dealing with flows and stocks on regional labour markets. Combining administrative data at the micro level with various macro data, the MAS describes the dynamic transition process of the 180 local labour market areas in Germany. We use a new algorithm, related to entropy optimization, to estimate unknown transitions. Compared with conventional methods, the main advantage of our proceeding is that additional information from different data sources can be included that is of an inherently fuzzy character. Copyright 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2007.

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  • Anette Haas & Thomas Rothe, 2007. "Labour Market in Motion: Analysing Regional Flows in a Multi-accounting System," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(4-5), pages 667-687, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:21:y:2007:i:4-5:p:667-687

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Uwe Blien & Friedrich Graef, 2013. "The ADETON method," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 33(2), pages 135-150, October.

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